Deontology

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Deontology

 

a branch of ethics that deals with the problem of duty. The term was introduced by the English utilitarian philosopher J. Bentham, who used the term to denote a theory of morality in general (Deontology, or the Science of Morals, vols. 1–2, 1834).

References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps notions of deontological desert may be relevant for the limited purpose of providing a "transcendent check on the justness of [a society's] liability rules.
that there are deontological constraints, or constraints of
Strict deontological reasoning considers an act's consequences irrelevant to its moral justification; only the means may justify the means.
will introduce a new deontological framework for the analysis of
A pure deontological theory could get by with rankings in terms of rightness only (though this is rare).
Conversely, her review of deontological arguments for parenting leaves none standing: childbearing is not intrinsically valuable; there is no duty to transmit family name, genes, or property; there is no political or religious obligation to reproduce (70).
Although the Dalai Lama seems to justify rights ultimately on a deontological base (the special status or worth of our natural aspiration to be happy), he often refers to compassion in order to reinforce respect for such rights, for instance, when he says, "One aspect of compassion is to respect others' rights" (Healing 5).
In particular, this chapter sheds light on the controversial question of whether natural-law theory is essentially deontological or teleological--or a sophisticated combination of both.
They fail to pass ethical tests both from a deontological (the right thing to do) and a consequentialist (leads to good outcomes) approach.
as libertarians we are concerned with the deontological justification for visiting upon the criminal his aggressive act, which comes from the act itself.
In contrast, deontological or moral-based accounts have long informed our conceptualization of criminal law and punishment.
On the other hand, the deontological is more concerned with the character and the effects of the procedure, regardless of the outcomes produced.