Deontology

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Deontology

 

a branch of ethics that deals with the problem of duty. The term was introduced by the English utilitarian philosopher J. Bentham, who used the term to denote a theory of morality in general (Deontology, or the Science of Morals, vols. 1–2, 1834).

References in periodicals archive ?
certain catastrophic point, many deontologists agree that their
This assessment is not directly connected to the thinking of the deontologists mentioned earlier.
Surely the moderate deontologist will say that although lying is bad it is not as bad as causing death, and so what she should do here is lie.
Not only do they present people as multidimensional, rather than solely as egoists, or utilitarians, or deontologists, thus making literature more realistic, but they also explore how characters change as the stories unfold.
A liberal deontologist, on the other hand, can hold that we ought to respect the autonomy of every citizen.
Typically, we are raised to try to avoid inner turmoil and our consequentia-list and deontologist heritage reinforces these flight proclivities.
A deontological theory emphasizes duties, but a deontologist can also be concerned about consequences.
39) If this is the case, then he is a deontologist.
A welfarist or utilitarian is free to believe and contend that welfare or utility is uniquely suitable to assessing human conduct broadly, but she cannot count it against her deontologist rivals that retributive or corrective justice is not.
By contrast, Tom Regan, a contemporary deontologist, argues that animals do have significant moral status, and that almost all animal research is immoral.
The deontologist thinks you have greater reason that you not directly and intentionally kill than I have that you not directly and intentionally kill.
According to a deontologist, wrongful action does not consist of doing