Deontology

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Deontology

 

a branch of ethics that deals with the problem of duty. The term was introduced by the English utilitarian philosopher J. Bentham, who used the term to denote a theory of morality in general (Deontology, or the Science of Morals, vols. 1–2, 1834).

References in periodicals archive ?
2) Though (1) is a tautology, the important point is that deontologists underestimate the extent to which pursuing fairness can in fact diminish welfare.
recent statistical analysis (104)), even deontologists should put aside
Thus a deontologist calls people good if they have charity, but calls conduct right if it is neither intrinsically wrong nor disproportionate.
But we have the term "bestness" and, for both consequentialists and moderate deontologists, it seems that it is possible to say everything that needs to be said about the option that would in fact be best just by saying that it would be best.
Finally, while deontologists and utilitarians alike think that all moral problems are, in principle, resolvable, for many philosophers, such as Lyotard (1989) and Hampshire (1987), morality is essentially conflictual.
Deontologists believe that certain acts are categorically wrong irrespective of their consequences.
Would not the use of terms familiar to students of European and North American ethics produce "biased" or distorted accounts of groups far removed from debates between deontologists and utilitarians, or between advocates of natural law and divine command theories of ethics?
He asks how rational deontologists can explain the coincidence between our alarm-like emotional reactions and their ethical views.
According to deontologists, deferring payments to vendors beyond agreed upon terms would be unethical.
Deontologists may confront their unique brand of moral "face-offs" in circumstances in which moral obligations practically conflict.
Two, even professional deontologists do not agree about the concrete contents of deontology in general and of business deontology in particular.
readings tend to be deontologists, not consequentialists.