departure

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departure

Nautical
a. the net distance travelled due east or west by a vessel
b. the latitude and longitude of the point from which a vessel calculates dead reckoning

What does it mean when you dream about departure?

Breaking away from a situation or relationship, a way of doing things. Seeking independence by “leaving home.”

departure

[di′pär·chər]
(meteorology)
The amount by which the value of a meteorological element differs from the normal value.
(navigation)
The distance between two meridians at any given parallel of latitude, expressed in linear units, usually nautical miles; the distance to the east or west made good by a craft in proceeding from one point to another.
The point at which reckoning of a voyage begins; usually established by bearings of prominent landmarks as the vessel clears a harbor and proceeds to sea; when a person establishes this point, he is said to take departure. Also known as point of departure.
Act of departing or leaving.

departure

departure
i. The distance between two given meridians measured along a standard parallel and expressed in nautical miles. It is the east-west component of the rhumb-line distance between two points. The value of departure between two meridians decreases with increasing latitudes, and vice versa. Departure in nautical miles = change of longitude in minutes x cosine mean latitude.
ii. The distance traveled in an east to west direction between two points.
iii. Aircraft taking off from an airport under departure control.
iv. Aeroelastic instability that may exist in roll, pitch, or yaw. Aircraft may break up during an aereoelastic departure. It is a situation in which there is an uncommanded increase in the angle of attack (α) and consequent loss of control. It is a form of aerodynamic departure as in a pitch-up.
v. The action or event of an aircraft leaving a place, as in “5 departures, 2 arrivals.”
References in classic literature ?
This usage, with some differences we had with a Moor, made us very desirous of leaving this country, but we were still put off with one pretence or other whenever we asked leave to depart.
He may now depart in peace and innocence, a sufferer and not a doer of evil.
He proceeded to the banks of the Hudson, and looked about among the vessels moored or anchored in the river, for any that were about to depart.
Will you depart--will you depart, if I give you that you demand?
I inquired (since I did not wish Polina to depart without an explanation).
Monsieur," said the officer, coming up to him, "I await your good pleasure to depart.
Only an hour before, Jerry had come down from the plantation house to the beach to see the Arangi depart.
that thou mayest depart renowned like the sun setting in the west.
And if, by any chance, he should look in here, I felt assured he would soon depart on seeing me, for, instead of becoming less cool and distant towards me, he had become decidedly more so since the departure of his mother and sisters, which was just what I wished.
Upon which she was presently led off by her own maid and Mrs Western: nor did that good lady depart without leaving some wholesome admonitions with her brother, on the dreadful effects of his passion, or, as she pleased to call it, madness.
He sits to rest on a rock just within a sacred grove of the Furies and is bidden depart by a passing native.
Before I depart I will give them to you; they will prove the truth of my tale; but at present, as the sun is already far declined, I shall only have time to repeat the substance of them to you.

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