depauperate


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical.

depauperate

[dē′pȯ·pə·rət]
(biology)
Inferiority of natural development or size.
References in periodicals archive ?
The lower part of the section corresponding to the Birstonas Formation (Jaagarahu Regional Stage) is depauperate of short-ranging conodont species, which precludes conodont-based biozonation of this interval.
In California, offshore oil platforms have accumulated a broad array of marine life from the surface to the seafloor in areas that are otherwise depauperate of natural reef or complex structure.
Interestingly, the streams that were located in suburban parks also possessed depauperate macroinvertebrate communities, as evidenced by low scores.
It had been assumed that these inputs of degraded water from upstream would limit the fish population in the lower Pigeon River to a depauperate community of pollution-tolerant species (Wiley and Seelbach 1998; MacDonald et al.
canescens (Sagastegui 6001) at the University of Trujillo is actually a depauperate example of V.
The relatively depauperate Holarctic faunas are the best known overall (Froeschner, 1988; J.
Deciduous leaves are less fibrous and easier to harvest and digest than aquatic plants, but because many boreal forests are depauperate in sodium (Belovsky and Jordan 1981), forest plants typically have less sodium than aquatic plants.
He found that these restricted populations were not genetically depauperate.
pestis is genetically depauperate (149) and behaves as an obligate host parasite, as some have suggested (79,147), the dependence of larvae on adult flea sanguineous excreta could significantly support Y.
There is little clear evidence that this site has a depauperate spider fauna, despite its relatively isolated position in a fragmented landscape.