dependent variable


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dependent variable

[di′pen·dənt ′ver·ē·ə·bəl]
(mathematics)
If y is a function of x, that is, if the function assigns a single value of y to each value of x, then y is the dependent variable.

dependent variable

the measure of the effect of the INDEPENDENT VARIABLE. Thus, in an experiment, or in data analysis, the independent variable (for example, number of years in school) is manipulated, or otherwise controlled, and the effect of this manipulation is seen by the change in the dependent variable (for example, reading proficiency). See also EXPERIMENTAL METHOD.
References in periodicals archive ?
A multiple regression analysis conducted with alcohol consumption as the dependent variable revealed that GPA, popularity at school, and CES-D scores accounted for a significant portion of the variance in adolescent alcohol use, suggesting that adolescents with low GPA and high self-ratings of popularity and depression were more likely to drink alcohol (Table 1).
For the dependent variable, workplace frustration, workers were asked to indicate the extent to which they agreed or disagreed with the statement, "I often feel frustrated with my work situation.
Not only is the physical structure of dependent variables being altered more thoroughly, through the application of physics, chemistry, genetics, engineering, etc.
In most cases the dependent variable in single-subject educational research is a form of observable behavior.
Suits (1983) suggested a shifting process, Shifting Process I, which expresses the category regression coefficients as deviations from an "average," where the "average" is the unweighted mean of the dependent variable across all categories for a categorical variable.
Concern about the proper interpretation of a regression coefficient in a semilogarithmic functional form was originally expressed by Halvorsen and Palmquist (1980), who warned against interpreting the coefficient of a dummy variable as being the proportional change in the dependent variable.
50% known, 83% known, and 90% known, were used with a 1-week retention interval and both recall and on-task behavior being the dependent variables.
Standard error of the dependent variable measured upon entry and exit is 3.
Regression analysis does provide a quantifiable measure of impact, but the limitations of multiple regression are that you can have only one dependent variable and it is difficult to examine the indirect influences that the variables have on each other.
The lag of the dependent variable is included to correct for autocorrelation, which is present in the data.
In MR, the dependent variable (performance) was conceptualized as the participant's game score divided by the opponent game score.