depletion

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depletion

[də′plē·shən]
(ecology)
Using a resource, such as water or timber, faster than it is replenished.
(electronics)
Reduction of the charge-carrier density in a semiconductor below the normal value for a given temperature and doping level.
(nucleonics)
The percentage reduction in the quantity of fissionable atoms in the fuel assemblies or fuel mixture that occurs during operation of a nuclear reactor.

depletion

see ENVIRONMENTAL DEPLETION.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nutrient Depletions allows you to share what you found with your family, friends and patients through an easy in-app email feature.
Ineffective albumin depletion was defined as depletion efficiency of <90%, and calculated as follows:
First quarter 2010 depletions growth benefited from the weak performance in the first quarter of 2009, which was down 6% compared to the first quarter of '08.
California Table Wines drove Allied Domecq Wines' growth in America, topping 1 million cases in depletions for the second year running and finishing ahead of last year's record showing.
Our fourth quarter depletions growth reflected improvements in the Samuel Adams brand family and the Twisted Tea brand family," said Martin Roper, company President and CEO.
He found that when both equatorial stratospheric and sea surface temperatures increased from one summer to the next, ozone depletions in October and November were worse than the year before.
Other types of measurements did not detect ozone depletions inside the hole until later, Proffitt says.
Bernard Farmer, the new measurements add to a growing pile of evidence that chlorine causes the depletions.
The research community is debating two theories to explain the ozone depletions.
As scientists around the world struggleto determine the mechanism that creates the ozone hole in the stratosphere above Antarctica each year, one group says it has found important evidence that chlorine --a by-product of human use of chlorofluorocarbons--is partially responsible for these seasonal depletions of Antarctic ozone.
But while the total ozone loss in that segment is 35 percent, the patch between 14 and 18 km lost more than 70 percent to its ozone from the initial high in August, and the researchers found depletions as great as 90 percent within 1- to 5-km-thick zones.
One of the greatest challenges facing the fishing and tourism-related industries in Northern Ontario is fish stock depletion.