depot


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depot

1. a storehouse or warehouse
2. Chiefly Brit a building used for the storage and servicing of buses or railway engines
3. US and Canadian
a. a bus or railway station
b. (as modifier): a depot manager
4. (of a drug or drug dose) designed for gradual release from the site of an injection so as to act over a long period

Depot

 

an enterprise that operates and repairs rolling stock: railroad cars, locomotives, motorcar sections of railroads and subways, trolley cars, and fire vehicles.

There are two types of depots: the type that is specialized by kind and type of rolling stock (locomotive, railroad car, motorcar) and the mixed type, designed to operate different types of rolling stock simultaneously, such as electric locomotives, diesel locomotives, motorcar trains, and rail-mounted cranes. The primary functions of depots are operating rolling stock in accordance with the traffic schedule and making repairs to ensure traffic safety. Depots include production buildings with technical equipment (machine tools, accessories, and tools), power equipment, and hoisting and transporting devices; warehouses for spare parts and materials; structures for cleaning and washing rolling stock; depot (traction) lines; units for turning rolling stock around; and units for supplying rolling stock with fuel, sand, water, and other materials. The largest enterprises that serve rolling stock are locomotive and railroad car depots.

There are two types of locomotive depots: primary depots and turnaround depots (or turnaround points). The primary depots have an allocated fleet of rolling stock, keep track of its condition on a planned basis, and perform various types of repair. With operation sections up to 1,000-2,000 km long the locomotives are run by shift brigades of different depots. The productive activity of the depots is measured by the amount of rolling stock, the total annual distance traveled, and the number of periodic repairs. The volume of shipping and its prime cost are important indexes of depot operational work. A system of planned preventive maintenance has been adopted in railroad transportation. The condition of rolling stock is checked, and various types of repair are performed depending on distance traveled or after set time intervals. The primary method of repair is the aggregate-assembly method, which is based on the use of compatible junctions and interchangeable assemblies. For this purpose the depots have inventories of new subassemblies and assemblies or ones that have been repaired beforehand.

Locomotive depots are built with rectangular, stepped, and fan-shaped buildings. The stepped type of depot is most promising. It is not as wide as the rectangular arrangement but has more tracks, with two or more stalls on one track, workshops located close to repair points, and better natural illumination of all buildings. Depots of the stepped type are easily expanded by building on new sections. Fan-shaped depots [roundhouses] were built for steam locomotives and do not meet requirements for maintaining modern rolling stock.

Turnaround depots are designated for supplying and inspecting locomotives and repairing them where necessary. The turnaround points have rooms where locomotive brigades can rest between trains. Skilled workers with the necessary tools, spare parts, and materials work in shifts to inspect and carry out repairs on rolling stock.

Subway depots have a large number of tracks for parking rolling stock and carrying out all types of repair (primary depots) and for inspections and other types of operations except for major planned overhaul (parking depots). Each subway line usually builds its own depot. Trolley-car and trolleybus depots also have large parking areas and repair trolley cars and trolleybuses. Depots are built according to standard plans.

REFERENCE

Obshchii kurs zheleznykh dorog, 3rd ed. Edited by I. V. Modzolevskii. Moscow, 1960.

E. E. RIDEL

depot

[′dep·ō]
(ordnance)
An establishment for storing supplies or for maintaining equipment.
The installation for this establishment.

depot

1. A place of deposit; a storehouse or warehouse.
2. A railroad station; a building for the accommodation and shelter of passengers and the receipt and transfer of freight by the railroad.
References in classic literature ?
At last there was something to do in those long, empty summer evenings, when the married people sat like images on their front porches, and the boys and girls tramped and tramped the board sidewalks-- northward to the edge of the open prairie, south to the depot, then back again to the post-office, the ice-cream parlour, the butcher shop.
He gave up hunting; he declined entertainments at Fuddleston: he would not dine with the mess of the depot at Mudbury: his great pleasure was to stroll over to Crawley parsonage--whither Miss Crawley came too; and as their mamma was ill, why not the children with Miss Sharp?
On the way to the depot he saw nothing of those who saluted him.
When the train glided into the depot he was on his feet and ready to leave it.
And after that, the bridesmaids begin to come by rail- road from various parts of the country, and to come like adorable recruits enlisted by a sergeant not present; for, on arriving at the Veneering depot, they are in a barrack of strangers.
Now, mark you, Ettie, it will be just a word to you, and when it reaches you, you will drop everything and come right down to the waiting room at the depot and stay there till I come for you.
The chief union which troubled it was the teamsters'; and when these freight tunnels were completed, connecting all the big factories and stores with the railroad depots, they would have the teamsters' union by the throat.
The cities of Germany are absolutely free, they own but little country around them, and they yield obedience to the emperor when it suits them, nor do they fear this or any other power they may have near them, because they are fortified in such a way that every one thinks the taking of them by assault would be tedious and difficult, seeing they have proper ditches and walls, they have sufficient artillery, and they always keep in public depots enough for one year's eating, drinking, and firing.
Above, many telegrams were dispatched from and within the depot many years back.
on a cold November day, about 40 day laborers with attentive eyes, layers of clothes and marked-up boots gathered in a nearly empty parking lot in front of Home Depot at 28th Street and Cicero Avenue.
The last stop is the depot test line where depot artisans and military crews perform a series of ground tests and checks until they deem the aircraft ready to fly.
While touring the facility, Cody met Joe Clayborn, who has put in seven years of service at the depot.