depressor

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depressor

[di′pres·ər]
(anatomy)
A muscle that draws a part down.
(chemical engineering)
An agent that prevents or retards a chemical reaction or process.
References in periodicals archive ?
After an extensive epidemiologic investigation of an outbreak of gastric mucormycosis in an intensive care unit, Maravi-Poma et al reported that the cause had been traced to the use of wooden tongue depressors contaminated with R microsporus.
For children who cannot raise their hand or arm, lengthen the brush handle with a ruler, tongue depressor or long wooden spoon.
Our slender grasshoppers feature tongue depressor and toothpick legs that glue to the clothespin's sides.
Jim Eckman, a volunteer who's in charge of such stuff, was getting the depressors to help officials determine whether a jumper has scratched.
The buffer rivets securing the depressors onto the oil buffer body were installed wrong.
We then use the 9" (23 cm) bowl (or cardboard circle) as a template, and cut a circle using our tongue depressors as a knife.
Toothpicks, tongue depressors and other small tools may be used by the students to model the dough, cut the dough, imprint textures and to press different parts of the object together.
Do you need to unload inventory or secure a few pallets of tongue depressors in a short timeframe?
Here's what we keep on hand for worst case scenarios: A good basic first aid book (read it now, because you won't have the time to do it during a real emergency); Band-Aids, bandages, gauze, gauze pads, tape, elastic and butterfly bandages, lots of aspirin (could be your best barter item), peroxide as a disinfectant, tongue depressors for finger splints, eye wash and cup, a magnifying glass, tweezers and needles for wood splinters, arm sling, cold and allergy pills and cough drops.
The small alligator and dogs shown below left use tongue depressors for legs and clothespin parts for other features.
Up to this point, speech therapists have been using therapy tools like wooden tongue depressors or plastic straws to try and teach clients the proper place to touch their tongue," said Andy May, CEO of CompleteSpeech.