depth of field


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depth of field

[′depth əv ′fēld]
(optics)
The range of distances over which a camera gives satisfactory definition, when its lens is in the best focus for a certain specific distance.

depth of field

The area in an image from front to back that is in focus. The smaller the aperture (the larger the f-stop number), the more objects are in focus both near and distant. The wider the aperture (the smaller the f-stop number), elements in front of and behind the object in focus appear soft or blurry.

Set a Mood
In both moving and still pictures, depth of field (DOF) is widely used to call attention or create feelings. By focusing on one element in the image and leaving the rest blurry, the audience is drawn to that part of the frame. In addition, making surroundings softer or foggy can eliminate unwanted background objects that distract from the subject of the picture. See f-stop and focal length.


Quite a Difference
Changing the f-stop from f/29 (top) to f/4.5 (bottom) turns all the unwanted objects in the background into a blur.


Quite a Difference
Changing the f-stop from f/29 (top) to f/4.5 (bottom) turns all the unwanted objects in the background into a blur.
References in periodicals archive ?
These lenses typically deliver 180-degree angles of view or more, with maximum depth of field and infinity focusing.
Nobody is going to throw away their night vision goggles because of the poor depth of field, but the full promise of night vision isn't realized until this problem is overcome," James said.
The procedure is easy to perform: A set of digital photos of a single specimen, typically five to 15 images taken at very small increments in focus, is loaded into the program and the sharpest parts from all of the individual photos are fused into one composite image to create the effect of extended depth of field.
As an example of determining depth of field, first find the hyperfocal distance H for the 75-mm lens
By comparing the edge positions so determined with the known true edge positions, the accuracy and repeatability of the various edge detection algorithms can be determined as a function of edge shape and instrument depth of field.
The laser has a very limited depth of field for tissue ablation.
Unlike most pop recordings that seem absolutely studio-bound, this one actually has a depth of field and a homogeneity of players and instruments that suggest a live experience.
For high-magnification work, a more shallow etch depth is desired due to the more limited depth of field of the light microscope, while for low-magnification examination a deeper contrast etch is best.
The difference between his images and Bennetton's or Nike's lies not only in subject matter but in depth of field and emotional impact.
New version of award-winning software helps photographers create realistic depth of field after the shoot with powerful new features that provide blur control and lens simulation
For many decades (and well into the digital age) some landscape photographers used large format bellows cameras for the freedom of movement they provided to adjust depth of field and alter perspective without changing lenses or their shooting position.
With the depth of field known, the size of the subject suitable to be photographed with reversed 50mm prime lens is now easier to identify.