depth perception


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.

depth perception

[′depth pər′sep·shən]
(physiology)
Ability to judge spatial relationships.

depth perception

The ability to estimate depth or distance between points in the field of vision. Depth perception reduces progressively as visibility reduces and is totally absent in darkness.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Phab2 Pro, powered by Tango technology that senses and maps its surroundings, supports motion tracking, depth perception and area learning features.
The Newcastle team will now continue the research examining the algorithms used for depth perception in insects to better understand how human vision evolved and to develop new ways of adding 3D technology to computers and robots.
Two groups (experimental and control) performed a pre and post--training designed intervention in which Eye-hand coordination (EHC), Eye-foot coordination (EFC), visual acuity (VA), Visual memory (VM), Visual Tracking (VT), visual reaction time (VRT), Depth perception (DP) from different distances (10cm, 20cm and 30cm), Visual field (VF) and Performance level of shooting skill (3PS) were recorded.
com can take a simple vision test to determine if C3D will truly enhance their viewing experience, based on their existing depth perception function.
The findings of a role for arm length may help to explain depth perception and the limits of its accuracy, Domini said.
The federal agency stated that drivers begin to have difficulties with depth perception and visual functions at .
This is accomplished by restoring natural 3-D vision and depth perception when performing laparoscopic procedures and is independent of a surgeon's skill level.
With this technology, the patients continue to experience the benefits of minimal invasive surgery, while the surgeon gains the critical depth perception he needs during the operation.
As well as preventing bright lights from damaging the eye, the lenses will also improve colour and depth perception, resulting in improved clarity and contrast.
The idea of the experiment was to determine whether a man undergoing the rigors of weightlessness could maintain his depth perception.
My only complaint is that I wish I had had this thing for those several hundred times I was forced to rely on a spotter with sketchy depth perception and even worse hand signals.
All included subjects were right-handed and had accurate vision and depth perception.