derail

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derail

Chiefly US a device designed to make rolling stock or locomotives leave the rails to avoid a collision or accident

derail

[dē′rāl]
(engineering)
To cause a railroad car or engine to run off the rails.
A device to guide railway cars or engines off the tracks to avoid collision or other accident.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ares could recall only one serious derailment locally -- a tank car derailed on the Pan Am track with hazardous material.
In the photo, first responders gather around the derailment on Dec.
Mongeluzzi, "raising the cap to $295 million per single incident doesn't eliminate or soften the pain suffered by the victims and their families as a result of the derailment.
Officials say the number of people unaccounted for after the derailment was not yet confirmed and that search-and-rescue work was taking precedence over the investigation.
The new standard was enacted in Canada after a fiery derailment of a Montreal, Maine & Atlantic oil train derailment in July 2013 in Lac-Megantic, Quebec, which had killed 47 people, but oil trains meeting the new standard continue to derail and catch fire throughout North America.
Two of the train's cars, carrying Bakken crude from North Dakota, caught fire after a derailment near Galena, Ill.
The latest Canadian derailment, involving a Canadian National Railway Co.
But in its report today, the HSE states: "No evidence has yet been established to support speculation or theories that vandalism or deliberate unauthorised interference caused the derailment.
If the bridge had shifted, it could have caused a derailment.
More than 1,500 people were aboard the train at the time of derailment.
While we do not yet have all the details regarding the cause of the derailment, this situation underscores the importance of making sure our nation's infrastructure is in quality condition and is appropriately funded.
A company's rail equipment incident rate is calculated using the number of reportable derailments per million train miles.