derangement


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Related to derangement: Metabolic derangement

derangement

[di′rānj·mənt]
(mathematics)
A permutation of a finite set of elements that carries no element of the set into itself.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, for a non-critical derangement 6 of size n, [[tau].
Most of what we think we know about the Derangement comes from Longfellow's poem Evangeline, or at least resembles that poem in most of its details, even to those who have never read it.
In the case of your puzzle, if we label the four horses A, B, C and D there are only nine derangements which are possible: BADC, DCBA, DCAB, BCDA, DABC, BDAC, CADB, CDAB and CDBA.
From the eight surgical PSIs, we selected five (Table 1) whose definitions, based on ICD-9-CM codes, corresponded to the clinical definitions of NSQIP events: "postoperative physiologic/metabolic derangements," "postoperative respiratory failure," "postoperative pulmonary embolism/deep vein thrombosis" (PE/DVT), "postoperative sepsis," and "postoperative wound dehiscence.
In TMD, internal derangement typically results from disc displacement.
5) Some other metabolic derangements have also been reported in TB.
He does not, as did master historian Francis Parkman in his classic multi-volume study of the French-English struggle for North America, attribute the derangement to such single and simple causes such as the stubborn refusal of the Acadians (en tete comme un'Acadian) to assent to the English demand for an oath to the throne.
The most painful pain is a disc with an annular tear, or multiple tears in the annulus, (a condition) called Internal Disc Derangement.
One, according to Faragher, is that le grande derangement, or "the great upheaval," the Acadians suffered at the hands of the British government after nearly 10 years in North America qualifies in contemporary terms as the first example of state-sponsored ethnic cleansing on the continent.
It's from the book by Shirley Jackson, who made a career out of shocking stories about psychological derangement and alienation.
Arsenic found in a sample of hair from Britain's King George III (also known as the monarch who gave the American colonies something to really rebel against) came from medication administered to him by his court physicians to treat his "prolonged and profound mental derangement," according to an article in the Lancet.
And who could blame audiences for staying away in the millions when presented with such a hopeless smorgasbord of derangement and despair as was encapsulated in some of these movies.