derived class

derived class

(programming)
(Or "subclass") In object-oriented programming, a class that is derived from a base class by inheritance. The derived class contains all the features of the base class, but may have new features added or redefine existing features.

The synonym "subclass" is possibly confusing since the derived class has a superset of the base class's features.

Compare derived type.
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 2: Alternating classes of three participant verbs Coding of T, R Alignment Class one: T = 0, R = OBJ secundative 'give' type verbs T = OBJ, R = DAT indirective Derived class two: T = 0, R = OBJ secundative causatives T = OBJ, R = DAT indirective T = OBJ, R = OBJ neutral
This is remarkable through the abstract methods Load and Save defined in the base class, methods that any derived class will be obliged to implement.
Normally the implementation is realized by directly inheriting from the abstract class, which does not allow any changes on the inherited structure of the derived class.
In addition, when the matched-model index (chart 4) is compared with the hedonically derived class 1 and 3 indexes, the differences are small.
Each derived class must implement the properties defined by the base class; for example, a derived vector class must provide code to add two vectors.
A derived class implements one of the different alternatives of the variable aspect and the pattern-related responsibility.
In this inheritance situation, the class used as the starting point is known as the base class, and the new class is called the derived class.
Superclass corresponds to base class and subclass corresponds to derived class in C++.
These clashes are detected at compile time and the ambiguity can be resolved by redefining the member function in the derived class.