descending branch


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descending branch

[di′sen·diŋ ′branch]
(mechanics)
That portion of a trajectory which is between the summit and the point where the trajectory terminates, either by impact or air burst, and along which the projectile falls, with altitude constantly decreasing. Also known as descent trajectory.
References in periodicals archive ?
2A) and from the descending branch of the first perforator branch of the deep artery of thigh (Arteria produnda femoris) (Fig.
In this case, the descending branch of the diagram is not possible for statically determinated reinforced concrete structures and concrete elements because achievement of the ultimate state in the most intense section will lead to geometric variability and destruction.
The septal blood supply comes from branches of the left anterior descending coronary artery, the posterior descending branch of the right coronary artery1.
The LAD and LCX had thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) 3 flow, while the posterior descending branch and posterior lateral branch of the RCA had TIMI 1 flow.
Left main coronary artery stenosis area larger than 50% and left anterior descending branch, left circumflex artery and right coronary artery stenosis area larger than 75% were taken as the evaluation criteria; large branches such as diagonal branch, obtuse marginal branch and right ventricular branch were attributed to left anterior descending branch, left circumflex artery and right coronary artery.
After crossing the anterior surface of the kidney, it bifurcated into an ascending branch that went to the right suprarenal gland and a descending branch that ended in the posterior abdominal wall.
A floppy hydrophilic guidewire (Fielder FC, Asahi Intecc, Japan) was successfully advanced via the septal perforator from the LAD to the posterior descending branch of the RCA.
There may be a long dominant posterior descending branch of the RCA, terminating in the AIVS beyond the apex; a long parallel diagonal branch; or a dual LAD.
37) After exiting the subsartorial canal, the saphenous nerve branches into its two terminal branches, the infrapatellar branch, which innervates the infrapatellar fat pad as well as the rest of the anteromedial knee, and the descending branch which provides the distal sensory innervation to the skin and fascia on the anteromedial aspect of the leg and foot to the first metatarsal (Figure 5), as well as articular branches to the knee and ankle.
Split RCA was diagnosed as an RCA that featured a split posterior descending branch, with the anterior subdivision of the RCA leading to the distal portion of the posterior descending branch (which serves the posterior septum and the inferior wall of the left ventricle), but also leading to the anterior free wall of the right ventricle.
Our patient underwent ventricular septal myectomy (the Morrow procedure), a biatrial radiofrequency maze procedure, and a 3-vessel coronary arterial bypass procedure using the left internal mammary artery to the left anterior descending coronary artery and saphenous veins to the posterior descending branch of the right coronary artery and the first obtuse marginal branch of the left circumflex coronary artery.
According to the proportional length of each vessel segment in the coronary artery tree, segments were graded with different maximum numbers of points: 5 points for the left main stem, 20 for the left anterior descending artery, 10 for the main diagonal branch, 5 for the first septal branch, 20 for the left circumflex artery, 10 for the obtuse marginal and posterolateral vessels, 20 for the right coronary artery, and 10 for the right posterior descending branch.