desert pavement

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desert pavement

[¦dez·ərt ′pāv·mənt]
(geology)
A mosaic of pebbles and large stones which accumulate as the finer dust and sand particles are blown away by the wind. Also known as desert crust.
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Even trudging hikers, grazing animals, and the scrabbling of rodents and birds can disrupt desert pavements, exposing subsurface material to erosion and disrupting fragile ecosystems of fungi and algae.
Therefore, when desert pavements and their biota are wounded by human activity, it will take human action to heal them on a shorter timescale.
Similar jostling of small stones across the surface of the ground can play a part in healing damaged desert pavements.
One testament to the age and stability of some desert pavements is the desert varnish that coats only the upward-facing exposed surfaces of the pebbles.
Although the vegetation that triggered the purported feeding frenzies in the Greenwater Valley's desert pavements was ephemeral, the effects of foraging on the desert pavement have lingered much longer.
This type of erosion leads to the formation of desert pavements and wind deposits.
On weathering, the silcrete forms a desert pavement known as "billy gibbers.
This layer is known as a desert pavement and by other different names in different deserts.
Under the desert pavement, which protects them from accelerated erosion, the horizons of typical reg soils contain almost no stones.
This has led to the formation of a surface desert pavement that protects the underlying soil from intense erosion.
In these terms, the irreversible transformation of arid ecosystems into anthropic deserts is well documented in many of the world's arid areas, and shown by the cities buried under sand dunes along the Old Silk Road in northwestern China, the steppe grasslands in northern Africa that have become desert pavements, and the new dune fields in former croplands in the Sahel.
This process leads to the creation of desert pavements, the main cause of desertification.