Despair

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Related to despairing: despairingly, depressing

Despair

See also Futility.
Detection, Crime (See SLEUTHING.)
Destiny (See FATE.)
Achitophel
hanged himself from despair when his advice went unheeded. [O.T.: II Samuel 17:23]
Aram, Eugene
scholar murders from pressure of poverty. [Br. Lit.: Eugene Aram]
Bowery, the
Manhattan skid row for alcoholics. [Am. Hist.: Hart, 97]
Giant Despair
imprisons Christian and Hopeful in Doubting Castle. [Br. Lit.: Pilgrim’s Progress]
Hrothgar
Danish king desperately distressed by warrior-killing monster. [Br. Lit.: Beowulf]
Maurya
mother loses six sons in the sea. [Br. Lit.: Riders to the Sea]
Melusina
fairy who despaired when husband discovered secret. [Fr. Folklore: Brewer Handbook, 695]
Narcissus
wastes away yearning to kiss reflection of himself. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Handbook, 745; Rom. Lit.: Metamorphoses]
Slough of Despond
bog enmiring and discouraging Christian. [Br. Lit.: Pilgrim’s Progress]
Sullivan brothers
mother despairs over losing her five sons in WWII (1942). [Am. Hist.: Facts (1943), 106]
Tristram
or Tristan falsely told that Iseult is not coming to save him from fatal poisoning, he dies of despair. [Medieval Legend: Brewer Dictionary]
Waiting for Godot
tramps consider hanging themselves because Godot has failed to arrive to set things straight. [Anglo-French Drama: Samuel Beckett Waiting for Godot in Magill III, 1113]
References in periodicals archive ?
Allah, for human's inbuilt low capacity, depicts despair by saying: "And if We give man a taste of mercy from Us and then We withdraw it from him , indeed, he is despairing and ungrateful.
That said, if a Portuguese child ever goes missing in Britain, we must hope the police aren't as incompetent as those in the Algarve who let down a despairing family.
Imm al Ghazli said, "They were mentioned together because happiness cannot be obtained except through endeavour, hard work and diligence; a despairing person neither seeks nor endeavours, because what he hopes for is impossible in his eyes.
It is this determinate principle that emerges more explicitly towards the end of 1849's The Sickness unto Death, where doubt and loss of hope in forgiveness are evoked under the rubric of perhaps the most intensified form of despair: 'The Sin of Despairing of the Forgiveness of Sins (Offense)'.
Finally, in angry and despairing words that echo Job's own longing for the peace and rest of non-birth, Jeremiah curses the day when he was born, the day that would be the beginning of sorrow and suffering (20:14-18; cf.
When Mandan's Lear is howling, raging, cursing or despairing, for the most part, we're right there with him.