despot


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

despot

1. Politics an absolute or tyrannical ruler; autocrat or tyrant
2. History a title borne by numerous persons of rank in the later Roman, Byzantine, and Ottoman Empires
References in classic literature ?
One fell into a condition where everything acted against the natural tendency, and the other where everything acted for it; and so one turned out a pretty wilful, stout, overbearing old democrat, and the other a wilful, stout old despot.
Alfred who is as determined a despot as ever walked, does not pretend to this kind of defence;--no, he stands, high and haughty, on that good old respectable ground, the right of the strongest; and he says, and I think quite sensibly, that the American planter is `only doing, in another form, what the English aristocracy and capitalists are doing by the lower classes;' that is, I take it, appropriating them, body and bone, soul and spirit, to their use and convenience.
they have absolute control; they are irresponsible despots.
The public is despotic in its temper; it is capable of denying common justice when too strenuously demanded as a right; but quite as frequently it awards more than justice, when the appeal is made, as despots love to have it made, entirely to its generosity.
One hundred and seventy-three despots would surely be as oppressive as one.
At a public meeting in the Town-hall yesterday, I had the pleasure of hearing myself insulted by the speaker opposed to me in the question under discussion, by allusions to my private affairs; by cant about monsters without natural affection, family despots, and such trash; and when I rose to answer, I was met by a shout from the filthy mob, where the mention of your name enabled me at once to detect the quarter in which this base attack had originated.
Sensible despots have never confined that precaution to women: they have taken their whips with them when they have dealt with men, and been slavishly idealized by the men over whom they have flourished the whip much more than by women.
After he was gone, Dorothea dwelt with some agitation on this indifference of his; and her mind was much exercised with arguments drawn from the varying conditions of climate which modify human needs, and from the admitted wickedness of pagan despots.
Under the primeval despots of Egypt, history honestly confesses that man must have been as free as culture could make him.
Who cares how Arab kings and sheiks, who fit nicely into the useful despot model, treat their own people or how they deny them even the most fundamental rights and freedoms?
Despots who oppress with secret tricks, make much use of this feeling.