destitute

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destitute

lacking the means of subsistence; totally impoverished
References in classic literature ?
When the literary class betray a destitution of faith, it is not strange that society should be disheartened and sensualized by unbelief.
The doctor, therefore, left it on the 17th of March, 1854, and fled to the frontier, where he remained for thirty-three days in the most abject destitution.
Despite this destitution, the soldiers and officers went on living just as usual.
He had not been there since his first interview with Bulstrode in the morning, having been found at the Hospital by the banker's messenger; and for the first time he was returning to his home without the vision of any expedient in the background which left him a hope of raising money enough to deliver him from the coming destitution of everything which made his married life tolerable-- everything which saved him and Rosamond from that bare isolation in which they would be forced to recognize how little of a comfort they could be to each other.
How was it possible to associate the charming object of my heart's worship with the miserable story of destitution which I had just heard?
He had arranged a few regular lessons for the boys; and one night, as he paced up and down the dismal schoolroom, his swollen heart almost bursting to think that his protection and countenance should have increased the misery of the wretched being whose peculiar destitution had awakened his pity, he paused mechanically in a dark corner where sat the object of his thoughts.
Fyne was able to tell me all about it; and the phrase that would depict the nature of the change best is: an instant and complete destitution.
The glamour of youth enveloped his particolored rags, his destitution, his loneliness, the essential desolation of his futile wander- ings.
Female benevolence and female destitution could do nothing without him.
As Miss Haldin looked at her inquisitively she began to describe the emaciated face of the man, his fleshless limbs, his destitution.
Shorn of his graceful limbs, and brought down from his high estate to circumstances of utter destitution, and the deepest misery, he made shift to stump back to his old master, and beg for some relief.
Might he ask, was dying of destitution and neglect necessarily English?