detention


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detention

1. Law
a. custody or confinement, esp of a suspect awaiting trial
b. (as modifier): a detention order
2. a form of punishment in which a pupil is detained after school

Detention

In stormwater management, ponding of runoff in pools and basins for water-quality improvement and flood prevention.

Detention

 

in Soviet law, the deprivation of freedom for a short period (not exceeding 72 hours) of a person suspected of committing a crime in order to prevent him, before the measure of restraint has been decided upon, from escaping, continuing his criminal activity, or hindering the establishment of the truth. Detention is applied only to persons suspected of committing a crime for which punishment in the form of deprivation of freedom may be assigned.

Detention is carried out by an agency of inquiry or by an investigator. Detention is permitted if the suspect was caught during commission of the crime or immediately after; if eyewitnesses, including victims, directly indicate the person as the one who committed the crime; and if traces of the crime are discovered on the suspect, on his clothing, or in his dwelling. In other instances the suspect may be detained if he attempted to escape, if he has no permanent residence, or if his identity has not been established.

Since detention is connected with the deprivation of freedom, the law provides for the necessary procedural guarantees of the legality and validity of this investigative action. An agency of inquiry or an investigator must draw up a record of any instance of detaining a suspect, indicating the grounds and reasons for detention, and notify the procurator of the detention within 24 hours. Upon receiving the notification the procurator is obliged, within 48 hours, to sanction confinement under guard or to free the person detained.

I. D. PERLOV

References in classic literature ?
We'll have to sacrifice every thing not absolutely indispensable; I am anxious, at all hazards, to avoid a detention in these regions.
I told Ghak what I had written, and suggested that as soon as he could he should make new treaties with the various kingdoms of the empire, collect an army and march toward Thuria--this of course against the possi-bility of my detention through some cause or other.
Ah Moy got no farther ashore than the detention sheds of the Federal Immigration Board, whence he was deported to China on the next Pacific Mail steamer.
Or (as Cecilia suggested) had his detention at the school so bitterly disappointed him that he was too disheartened to write at any length?
service, and for the detention of offenders and appropriations.
Meanwhile, the company below stairs, after listening attentively and not hearing any noise which would justify them in interfering for the gratification of their curiosity, returned to the chamber of the Kenwigses, and employed themselves in hazarding a great variety of conjectures relative to the cause of Mr Noggs' sudden disappearance and detention.
It must evidently be, then, a gun of great range, since the length of the piece will increase the detention of the gas accumulated behind the projectile; but there is no advantage in passing certain limits.
They seemed to harbour no ill-feeling because of their detention.
The Hobo, my dear fellow, is the name for that particular place of detention in city and county jails wherein are assembled tramps, drunks, beggars, and the riff-raff of petty offenders.
Our detention, however, was very temporary, and Connal would seem to have received the usual vague orders to proceed in the early morning to the place where the other three companies had camped.
As we did not land at Boston, in consequence of some detention at the wharf, until after dark, I received my first impressions of the city in walking down to the Custom-house on the morning after our arrival, which was Sunday.
Hugh, deeming it possible that Barnaby was in the hands of the soldiers, and at that moment under detention at The Boot, was for advancing stealthily, and firing the house; but his companions, who objected to such rash measures unless they had a crowd at their backs, represented that if Barnaby were taken he had assuredly been removed to a stronger prison; they would never have dreamed of keeping him all night in a place so weak and open to attack.