detritivore

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detritivore

[di′trid·ə‚vȯr]
(ecology)
An organism that consumes dead organic matter.
References in periodicals archive ?
Interestingly, the two taxa experiencing persistent negative effects of geoduck aquaculture activities--Families Spionidae and Orbiniidae--are selective detritivores and deposit feeders, respectively (see Table 1 of VanBlaricom et al.
The trophic group analysis highlighted a substantial increase in soil engineers, detritivores and herbivores in the A0 humic soil layer after EFB application (Table 4).
We would predict that the laws of thermodynamics would still hold, and thus we would expect that the Biosphere would function in the same way as it always has done, with primary producers, primary consumers, secondary consumers and detritivores all present.
Stream communities can be very diverse, but, unlike terrestrial systems, their trophic structures are largely based on detritivores feeding on leaf litter that has fallen into the stream, as opposed to autotrophic activity within the stream.
The detritivores (crabs, shrimps, mollusks) in turn, are prey items for larger species (fish, birds).
In contrast, the evergreen fern species, sword fern, supported a relatively high abundance but low biomass of arthropods, reflecting an arthropod assemblage dominated by small detritivores such as Pscoptera and Collembola (Doolittle 2000) that were not important in bird diets.
They and other detritivores break down organic waste into small particles that fertilize plants and become soil.
As recommended by Simon & Lyons (1995) and Karr & Chu (1999), metrics that related to species richness and composition (number of native, minnow, sucker, and sunfish species), indicator species (sensitive species, % tolerant species, % pioneer species), trophic function (% insectivores, % detritivores, % carnivores), reproductive function (% lithophils), abundance (CPUE), and fish condition (% DELT).
One or more pseudoscorpions of the same species, in the green chamber of several nests of the same species of packrat would indicate that they actively seek, and remain in, this habitat to feed upon scavengers and detritivores (mostly mites)--this is commensalism.
Increases in leaf N:P ratios may also affect community structure and nutrition of herbivores and detritivores (Sterner and Elser 2002).
They function in food webs at all levels, from detritivores and herbivores to high level carnivores (Duellman & Trueb 1994; Dupuis et al.