hyperreflexia

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Related to detrusor hyperreflexia: detrusor areflexia

hyperreflexia

[¦hī·pər·ri′flek·sē·ə]
(medicine)
A condition of abnormally increased reflex action.
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Urodynamic tests may report detrusor hyperreflexia either sporadically or combined with impaired contractility, decreased bladder compliance or capacity, bladder hypersensitivity, hypoor acontractile bladder and increased postvoid residual urine concomitant to the detrusor hyperreflexia (3, 5- 8, 10).
Lusuardi, "Botulinum-A toxin injection into the detrusor: a safe alternative in the treatment of children with myelomeningocele with detrusor hyperreflexia," The Journal of Urology, vol.
14) showed that pinprick sensation and presence of BCR might be predictive of volitional voiding, but they were not sensitive about predicting detrusor hyperreflexia and sphincter dyssynergia.
3) Some very interesting studies are also currently being performed on the use of botulinum toxin (Botox, Dysport) in the urological treatment of patients with detrusor hyperreflexia.
Joy and Johnston (2001) suggest that 90% of people with MS experience bladder dysfunction at some point; detrusor hyperreflexia, detrusor sphincter dyssynergia, and detrusor areflexia are the three most common types.
Another 5%-10% have other conditions such as neurogenic detrusor hyperreflexia associated with stroke or back trauma.
Spinal cord lesions, interrupting spinal pathways between the pontine micturition center and the sacral spinal cord, are the most common cause of disordered bladder function and result in detrusor hyperreflexia.
Previous studies have demonstrated a high frequency of urological abnormalities in Parkinson's disease, with detrusor hyperreflexia being the most frequent finding [1-6].
The concept that elderly patients with urinary incontience due to detrusor hyperreflexia an be divided into two groups with differing natural histories on the basis of the detrusor contractility found on cystometry is reassessed.
The use of intravesical oxybutynin chloride in patients with detrusor hypertonicity and detrusor hyperreflexia.
Oxybutynin versus propantheline in patients with multiple sclerosis and detrusor hyperreflexia.
Artificial urinary sphincters have a limited role in managing incontinence in MS due to the high incidence of detrusor hyperreflexia.