screening

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screening

[′skrēn·iŋ]
(atomic physics)
The reduction of the electric field about a nucleus by the space charge of the surrounding electrons.
(electromagnetism)
(engineering)
The separation of a mixture of grains of various sizes into two or more size-range portions by means of a porous or woven-mesh screening media.
The removal of solid particles from a liquid-solid mixture by means of a screen.
The material that has passed through a screen.
(industrial engineering)
The elimination of defective pieces from a lot by inspection for specified defects. Also known as detailing.

screening

the use of academic qualifications as a means of selecting among candidates for employment, where it is the general level of academic qualification which is decisive rather than the particular content of the education. In this process, an employer may use educational qualifications, or sometimes also the type of institution attended, as a proxy for ‘general intelligence’, ‘perseverance and motivation’, or other 'social background’, instead of being interested in the specific content of the education received. see also CULTURAL CAPITAL.

According to the screening hypothesis, it is the screening process rather than any direct economic return on education which explains part of the correlation between level of education and level of income. This hypothesis provides an account of the effects of education which is at odds with other hypotheses (compare HUMAN CAPITAL). See also CREDENTIALISM, CULTURAL CAPITAL.

Screening

 

the sorting on screens of bulk materials according to particle size. Screening is used to separate coal, ore. building materials, and other bulk materials into fractions or to sort out particles of a given size. For example, in the production of crushed gravel (about 200 million cu m in the USSR in 1970). a mass of raw sand and gravel is sorted out into five fractions (70–40 mm. 40–20 mm, 20–10 mm, 10–5 mm, and less than 5 mm). During screening, the material is separated into layers as it moves along the sieve of the screen: the larger the particles, the higher the layer along which they move. Particles that are smaller than the screen openings (so-called lower grade) fall through the openings upon reaching the screen’s surface (screen underflow); larger particles (so-called upper grade) slide along the sieve and form the screen overflow. Because of limitations on the length of the screen, not all particles that are smaller than the sieve openings fall through; some remain in the screen overflow, contaminating it and reducing the quantity of the underflow.

The efficiency of screening depends on many factors: the size and shape of the particles in the initial material and the load it exerts on the screen, the type of screen, and the size and shape of the openings in the sieve, its length, and its angle of inclination. The maximum efficiency of trommels is 60–70 percent: of shaking screens. 70–80 percent; and of vibrating screens, 90–98 percent. Screening on sieves with openings of 3 mm and more is widespread in industry; openings of 1 mm are rarely encountered. Hydraulic classification or air separation is usually used to sort materials containing particles smaller than 1–3 mm. Since screening ensures high-quality sorting, its use is spreading, particularly the use of sieves with small openings.

Screening

A mechanical method of separating a mixture of solid particles into fractions by size. The mixture to be separated, called the feed, is passed over a screen surface containing openings of definite size. Particles smaller than the openings fall through the screen and are collected as undersize. Particles larger than the openings slide off the screen and are caught as oversize. A single screen separates the feed into only two fractions. Two or more screens may be operated in series to give additional fractions. Screening occasionally is done wet, but most commonly it is done dry.

Industrial screens may be constructed of metal bars, perforated or slotted metal plates, woven wire cloth, or bolting cloth. The openings are usually square but may be circular or rectangular. See Mechanical classification, Mechanical separation techniques, Sedimentation (industry)

screening

The application of technical or other means which are intended to detect weapons, explosives or other dangerous devices that may be used to commit an act of unlawful inference (ICAO).
References in periodicals archive ?
Meanwhile, the results of this study can contribute to the body of information that helps to inform and ultimately improve community education, developmental screening, and child-find outreach efforts to enhance early identification and intervention for developmental delays.
Glascoe (2000) found parent report surveys to be effective among parents of diverse educational backgrounds, mental health conditions, and cultures, and the AAP considers some parent questionnaires to be as valuable as formal developmental screening tests in identifying developmental delays (King et al.
16) Among these 25, are five behavioral assessments organized to occur during specified age periods and two autism screenings: one at 18 months and another at 24 months, developmental screenings for children under three years of age, and other salient development evaluations.
In our study, the patients were assessed by the Denver developmental screening test and psychomotor retardation was found in 232 patients (86%) and normal psychomotor development was found in 32 patients (2%).
Fewer than 75% of respondents agreed that there were enough child care spaces, enough developmental screening supports, or enough programs for children with special needs (see Figure 1, first bar in each cluster).
The project successfully established a questionnaire that could act as a communication and developmental screening tool between providers, and between providers and parents, as well as having sufficient psychometric properties to enable its use as a developmental screening tool for maternal and child health, childcare, preschool and primary school staff.
nursery nurses can do developmental screening, but that's task-oriented, and I feel that a health visitor isn't just doing that .
Then they assessed each child's cognitive development using adaptations of the MacArthur Communicative Development Inventory at 15 months and the Denver Developmental Screening Test at 18 months.
4-7) The KHAR does not require specific documentation of a child's performance in regard to developmental screening, but only whether the health care provider deems follow-up is necessary.
The Denver II Developmental Screening Test (DDST) is the most widely used developmental screening tool for this type of assessment.
Additionally, ask your doctor to do developmental screening on your child to be sure he is developing as expected.
WANDA SILVERMAN Children's Health & Developmental Screening Multnomah County Portland, Oregon, U.

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