dextromethorphan hydrobromide

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dextromethorphan hydrobromide

[¦dek·strō·mə¦thȯr·fən‚hī·drō′brō‚mīd]
(pharmacology)
C18H25NO·HBr·H2O White crystals or a crystalline powder; soluble in alcohol and chloroform; used in medicine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Review of dextromethorphan 20 mg/quinidine 10 mg (Nuedexta([R])) for pseudobulbar affect.
After 10 weeks, the 93 patients on dextromethorphan plus quinidine had their average neuropsychiatric inventory domain score for agitation and aggression cut roughly in half, compared with baseline, compared with about a 25% drop in average score among 66 control patients, a statistically significant difference for the study's primary endpoint, Dr.
Despite the availability of the dextromethorphan plus quinidine formulation, clinicians should avoid using it to treat agitation in Alzheimer's disease patients until data become available from phase III studies that involve at least 6 months of chronic therapy, Dr.
Since dextromethorphan acts on NMDA receptors, the findings suggest that people with fibromyalgia do not have a "radically altered" NMDA system, according to Staud's team.
001) increase in comet tail length and % MnPCE was observed in both acute and subacute studies of cyclophosphamide group, whereas codeine, dextromethorphan and dextropropoxyphene treated groups did not show any significant changes.
Thirty-five children were randomly assigned to receive an age-appropriate dose of honey, 33 to receive dextromethorphan and 37 to receive no treatment for one night within 30 minutes of bedtime.
Not only is dextromethorphan dangerous, it doesn't seem to be effective in children.
The AAP issued a statement in 1997 advising against the use of cough suppressants such as codeine and dextromethorphan (AAP, 1997).
The FDA (Food and Drug Administration) has identified products containing dextromethorphan as an easy target for abuse," said Robert Keane, spokesman for the supermarket chain.
While over-the-counter products containing dextromethorphan are perfectly safe when ingested at recommended dosage levels, there's a trend among many young people towards abusing these products," noted Ahold USA s.
Because of the unproven efficacy of the cough suppressants codeine and dextromethorphan in young children and the potential for adverse events, in 1997 the American Academy of Pediatrics issued a policy statement advising that parents should be educated regarding the lack of antitussive effects, risk for adverse events, and potential for overdose in children from these medications (7).