dharma

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dharma

(där`mə). In HinduismHinduism
, Western term for the religious beliefs and practices of the vast majority of the people of India. One of the oldest living religions in the world, Hinduism is unique among the world religions in that it had no single founder but grew over a period of 4,000 years in
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, dharma is the doctrine of the religious and moral rights and duties of each individual; it generally refers to religious duty, but may also mean social order, right conduct, or simply virtue. Sacred law is the codification of dharma, and Hinduism itself is also called Sanatana Dharma [the eternal dharma]. In BuddhismBuddhism
, religion and philosophy founded in India c.525 B.C. by Siddhartha Gautama, called the Buddha. There are over 300 million Buddhists worldwide. One of the great world religions, it is divided into two main schools: the Theravada or Hinayana in Sri Lanka and SE Asia, and
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, dharma has two distinct meanings: it refers to religious truth, namely Buddhist teaching as the highest truth; it is also used as a technical term to denote a constituent element of experience, or any existing thing or phenomenon.

dharma

See CASTE.

Dharma

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

The Hindu understanding of the word "dharma" is difficult to translate. Roughly, it refers to the order of the world and the moral behavior of those in it. But that doesn't really capture its all-encompassing meaning. Hinduism is very comfortable with things that really can't be pinned down with a concise definition. After all, creation came before language, so it is only logical to think there are limitations in expression. Dharma includes all that there is, so it naturally follows that the basic concept of the word has fuzzy outer edges that can't quite be contained by scientific categories.

In Buddhism, however, the word is easier to grasp. The Buddha used the word to refer to the doctrine he taught, beginning with the Four Noble Truths, the Eightfold Path, and the Middle Way (see Buddhism).

Dharma

 

a Sanskrit word used in the ancient and medieval literature of India to express very varied concepts, including law, religion, obligation, justice, soul, and custom. Of all these concepts, the basic one is that which refers to the group of religious, moral, social, and family obligations placed on a human being by the laws and customs of his varna and caste. The observance of these precepts supposedly secures the successful transmigration of the soul or even the freeing of the soul from the influence of karma. In Buddhist literature the word dharma meant above all the teaching of Buddha.

Dharma

multi-faceted concept of morality, truth, doctrine. [Hindu Rel.: Parrinder, 77]

dharma

1. Hinduism social custom regarded as a religious and moral duty
2. Hinduism
a. the essential principle of the cosmos; natural law
b. conduct that conforms with this
3. Buddhism ideal truth as set forth in the teaching of Buddha
References in periodicals archive ?
Overtime, GTB, by violating all dharmic principles of running sound and honest banking business, advanced large amounts of loans to bull--(speculator-driven and stock market manipulator)--KP and his associated companies of questionable norms (practically every investment company of the KP group had an account at GTB and enjoyed generous funding by GTB) whose ways of doing business were: come what may, get rich too soon by loan diversion and misuse of sanctioned loans, manipulation, swindling and related unethical business practices.
The problem is not simply a "gloomy" environment, but the impossibility of resolving the disjunction between an ideal dharmic world of fixed roles (see, among many studies, Hiltebeitel's masterful analysis in ch.
The collapsing of atmatusti and samyaksamkalpajakama as two aspects of the same dharmic action may be an effort by Aparaditya to harmonize the YS list of sources with that of the MDh by eliminating samyaksamkalpajakama as an additional source.
Unlike the gopis and others, however, Krsna himself is not bound by his own dharmic instructions, as 6uka explains to Parlksit when the latter questions Krsna's behavior with the gopis on the basis of dharma:
One could maintain that dependent origination is compatible with the future-determining dharmic choices Story thinks express our freedom, yielding soft determinism, but his non-absolute determinism invites indeterminism.
36), that, like the hundred-thousand-verse Mbh, offer dharmic instruction for kings.
Jamison's chapter provides a fine illustration of this, as her examination of depictions in Kalidasa's plays of marriages "that seem to run directly counter to proper, dharmic marriage rites" leads her to a consideration of Vedic, Epic and Dharmasastra texts as a means to discover "reasons for and possible justifications of" these departures from the norm (p.
Of course, Gauri is not your typical dharmic spouse.
prayoga)--of a corpus of material that is, after all, essentially ethical in character, from the mastery of Sanskrit as dharmic activity (especially for the brahmin) to the sum total of the tradition, of which the brahmin is arbiter.
Dharmic obligations make humans responsible for tending nature that is everywhere spiritually alive; non-violent practice supports human ties to the natural world; rebirth binds human life to lives of many other beings; and all parts of prakrti or nature are made up equally throughout the five elements.
LANGUAGE NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] But Dusyanta does not have to be cast out: the abandonment of his social personality as dharmic hero is here understood as delusion; and yet the fruits of his delusion--both his love for Sakuntala and his child by her--become the instrumentalities whereby his delusion is ended, and his social personality is validated.
The discussion comes as part of the Adhikara section of the work, where the role of sannyasa in achieving liberation, and the purpose of following dharmic injunctions is discussed.