diachronous


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diachronous

[dī′ak·rə·nəs]
(geology)
Of a rock unit, varying in age in different areas or cutting across time planes or biostratigraphic zones. Also known as time-transgressive.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The formation is diachronous and has been assigned to be of the Turonian-Maastrichtian Age.
The diachronous nature of the relatively thin Dayton suggests the possibility that two different formations in western Ohio are presently recognized as a single formation because of their similar stratigraphic position and no previous solid evidence to the contrary.
An advantage of this synchronous rather than diachronous approach is that we are presented with an au courant discussion of policy.
Moreover, the level of immigration of a certain faunal group always has high potential to be a diachronous boundary, if this level is to be correlated with other occurrences of the immigrants outside South China.
Diachronous recovery patterns in early Silurian corals, graptolites and acritarchs.
This provides the best estimate for the age of the Bluestone Quarry Formation, assuming the contacts are not diachronous.
In combination with the natural sciences, archaeology in Central Europe has repeatedly demonstrated its potential for the diachronous reconstruction of landscape forms (e.
The intervening southerly Neotethys basin remained partly open in the Early Tertiary, and it was finally closed by diachronous collision in Eocene-Miocene time, followed by further convergence and overthrusting during late Miocene.
According to Janson, "a 'longitudinal study' can be any diachronous study or a study of a process of change" (1981, p.
4 Ga) in the south, and may have been diachronous from north to south.
High-resolution U-Pb ages from the Upper Triassic Chinle Formation (New Mexico, USA) support a diachronous rise of dinosaurs.