diacritic


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diacritic

A diacritic (or diacritical mark) is a mark added to a letter, usually to indicate a specific pronunciation of that letter.
Of the various languages using the Latin alphabet, English is one of the few that generally does not use diacritical marks. Those words that do contain them are typically foreign loanwords whose diacritics have been retained in English. The most common of these that appear in English are known as accents (either acute, as in café, or grave, as in vis-à-vis).
There are, however, a few diacritics that are used in native English words.
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diacritic

A small mark added to a letter that changes its pronunciation, such as an acute accent (á), a grave accent (à) and a cedilla (ç).
References in periodicals archive ?
The problem with modern written Arabic is that often the diacritics (pronunciation accents) have been removed.
There is also considerable evidence for diacritic reduplication of consonants in Old English in MSS of Northumbrian provenance.
Diacritic signs or marks are actually signs which, when added to a letter, modify its value, or allow to distinguish between two homographs (homographic words).
Microsoft's Character Design Standards is the only official and available resource for the diacritic design.
The latter demand also includes the writing of numerous Polish diacritic signs, which usually is avoided in official documents outside Poland.
What name is given to the diacritic mark which forms the dot over the letter i?
The reviewer is pleasantly surprised to find the Sanskrit text provided with diacritic marks--a practice which has almost disappeared with digital composing.
Finally, early versions of Blackboard do not support use of diacritic marks and non-Roman writing systems except in posted documents--a problem if languages other than English need to be used for Announcements, Discussion Board etc.
These four characters require the use of a base character and a combining diacritic (U+0308 COMBINING DIAERESIS).
A schwa is "a diacritic marking silence instead of a vowel sound," according to Webster's, and the name is appropriate for Calvin Schwa, who is "functionally invisible"--nobody ever notices him, even when they're standing next to him.
The same word with its diacritic for the glottal stop in a poem by Imaikalani Kalahele of Hawai'i, a graduate of McKinley High School (not, as the biographical notice has it un page 85, McKinley University) caused an editorial problem on page 92 in the lines "Returning once more / over the mo'os back," where mo'o should be followed by an apostrophe.