diacritic

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Related to diacritical: Diacritical marks

diacritic

A small mark added to a letter that changes its pronunciation, such as an acute accent (á), a grave accent (à) and a cedilla (ç).
References in periodicals archive ?
In order to enable proper diacritical design and achieve legibility, the most common practices and mistakes were established by measuring geometry of the dcroat diacritical mark in different font faces.
A number of minor issues detract from the overall quality of the book: diacritical marks are used inconsistently throughout the text (even among the names of mediators Ambassador Domicio da Gama [sic] of Brazil and Minister Eduardo Suarez Mujica of Chile), and the map of Mexico that highlights the State of Morelos seems an odd choice.
Note: the text was edited without diacritical marks which have no syllabic or vocalic value.
Each consonant has an inherent vowel/a/, and when the consonant phoneme has to be changed, secondary vowels or diacritical marks are added before, after, below, or above the letter.
This is followed by practical tips and information, a glossary of Sanskrit words though without any diacritical marks, and some suggestions for further reading.
1) In the case of some of the Sanskrit terms used in this review, a typed character will lack the proper, traditional diacritical marking.
Diacritical perception is the production of meaning that is "between" perceptual components so that no perceptual component is given without others and hence without opening up to a field of differentiations.
In transcribing the manuscript Maria Careri and Graziella Chiarcossi have included a number of diacritical marks to indicate the presence, in the body of the text, of a number of annotations, underscores, erasures and other graphemes inserted by the author.
Editor Meg Taylor let an occasional typographical error and garbled Czech diacritical slip through, but otherwise, the book is attractively bound and printed with informatively captioned photographs adorning almost every page.
Valeri 2000:93-98, who provides an incisive critique of Levi-Strauss's interpretation of totemism as no more than a diacritical system of classification.
In Hebrew, vowels are shown as diacritical signs (called nikkud, or points), and because 1st-graders in Hebrew read with these points, they were added to all the questions.
This thirty-one page colour illustrated primer helped children learn the letters of the Croatian alphabet, particularly the letters containing diacritical marks, as well as the cardinal and ordinal numerals up to ten.