dial press

dial press

[′dīl ‚pres]
(mechanical engineering)
A punch press with dial feed.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Beth Book, a popular 1897 novel by Sarah Grand (republished as recently as 1980 by The Dial Press), contains the sentence (page 200 of the Dial Press edition):
It was Doctorow who edited An American Dream when he served as an editor at Dial Press in the mid-1960s.
Let them refill in a word or a dial press, but provide them with the option of connecting to a pharmacist right then, or with a scheduled callback if they require it.
Around that same time, Elizabeth Sutherland was in the island quietly collecting material for her personal report on Cuba, what would become The Youngest Revolution (published by Dial Press in 1969).
Maury Allen, Bo: Pitching and Wooing, the Dial Press, 1973, 104.
Richard Marek, author of [i]Works of Genius[/i], a novel about the relationship between authors and publishers, and once editor-in-chief of the Dial Press, has worked with numerous writers including Robert Ludlum.
Twenties GirlBy Sophie Kinsella, Dial Press, 435 pages, $20
When he talked with George Joel of Dial Press, the only publisher who had shown any interest in his protest novel, Yerby convinced Joel to let him try writing a historical novel.
Welcome to the Monkey House, The Dial Press, 352 pages, $14 (paper)
Jon was able to finish a draft of his first and only novel, Four Steps to the Wall, which earned him a publishing contract with the Dial Press.
His touching and sometimes humorous excursions up and down stream - occasionally with his wife and their infant daughter, often with just his two dogs - led to his eighth book, a collection of essays titled, "Temple Stream: A Rural Odyssey" (The Dial Press, $25 hardcover; $14 softcover).
published by Dial Press in the US in 2004, more than a year before Little, Brown signed Viswanathan.