diamictite


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diamictite

[dī·ə′mik‚tīt]
(petrology)
A calcareous, terrigenous sedimentary rock that is not sorted or poorly sorted and contains particles of many sizes. Also known as mixtite.
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Lithofacies types and vertical profile models; an alternative approach to the description and environmental interpretation of glacial diamict and diamictite sequences.
Where present, primary and stromatolitic carbonates are separated from underlying diamictite units by unconformities or many tens and sometimes hundreds of metres of marine strata, thereby questioning any supposed immediate 'cap' relationship (e.
In fact, banded iron deposits are not uniquely associated with Neoproterozoic diamictite deposits and often occur stratigraphically below such deposits, are absent outright, or are demonstrably postdepositional (Young, 2003).
1999, Cyclicities in Earth-warming episode recorded in the Rasthof cap carbonate overlying the Neoproterozoic Chuos diamictite in Namibia: Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, v.
Melanic soils develop from a variety of parent materials (Van der Merwe 2000), including arkosic sandstone, siltstone, mudstone, shale, diamictite, dolerite, basalt, notite, amphibolite, granite, gneiss, rhyodacite, and carbonates.
Lithofacies types and vertical profile models: an alternative approach to the description and environmental interpretation of glacial diamict and diamictite sequences.
At this site, baseball-size cobbles got mixed with a slurry of fine silt and sand to form a rock called diamictite.
When the ice melted back, it left behind the jumbled mixture that eventually formed diamictite, he and a colleague propose in the July GEOLOGY.
We assume diamictites represent cold temperatures, and we assume the carbonates represent temperatures like in the Bahamas or the Yucatfin," says Kaufman.
It was blanketed by carbonates and shales containing regionally mappable diamictite horizons of glacial origin.
2010) suggest a strong shift into icehouse conditions during the event and represent, beside coeval diamictites in western peri-Gondwana, an evidence of an early Silurian glaciation.
This remarkable gap in the regional fossil record is partially accounted for by a tectonically related 30 million year depositional hiatus, which began around 330 million years ago and was followed by a period of approximately 10 million years of deposition of the Dwyka Group (Karoo Supergroup) glacial diamictites.