Diamondback Moth

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Diamondback Moth

 

(Plutella maculipennis), a butterfly of the family Plutellidae, injurious to cruciferpus plants. Wing-span, 14–17 mm. The anterior wings are grayish or blackish brown with a wavy white stripe on the interior edge; the posterior wings are gray with a long fringe. The caterpillar is 9–12 mm long, spindle-shaped, and green. The eggs are pale yellow. The diamondback moth is distributed throughout the world. It does most damage to cabbage and rutabaga plants. There are between one and eight generations each year; the chrysalides winter on cruciferous weeds, stumps, and leaves. The moths emerge between April and June. One to three eggs are laid on the underside of leaves or on stems. The caterpillars first penetrate into the leaf tissue. They subsequently appear on the leaf surface, eating “little windows” in the leaves. Measures taken against the diamond-back moth include destruction of weeds, tillage of harvest remains, and treatment of plants with insecticides and the microbiological preparation entobacterin.

References in periodicals archive ?
Rothamsted Research, in Hertfordshire, issued a warning that exceptionally high numbers of the diamondback moth are arriving in the UK, after reports from a network of moth traps around the country.
The number of each of 4 types of sensilla along various antennal segments (1-10 = proximal end, 11-20 = middle, 21-30 = distal end) of female (A, C) and male (B, D) diamondback moths, Plutella xylostella.
Resistance of Diamondback Moth (Lepidoptera; Plutellide) to Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies in the field.
In this experiment, rapeseed leaves of each cultivar were tested in separated oviposition cages, as previously described, so that the diamondback moths were not given a choice among rapeseed cultivars.
The insect "hit-list" includes diamondback moth, pink hibiscus mealy-bug, wheat stem sawfly, gypsy moth, codling moth, apple leafrollers, olive fruit fly, grasshopper, locust, termites, Asian longhorned beetle, and Lygus bug.
In contrast to flea beetles, which appear as soon as the plants emerge, diamondback moths appear when B.
To promote the marketing of rice, cotton and other cash crops this year, many preparation producers used avermectin on rice leaf rollers, diamondback moths of crucifers, asparagus caterpillars, and cotton bollworms and so on, increasing the demands for avermectin.
Producers continue to spray for bertha armyworms and diamondback moths in canola fields.
Experts have warned of a potential explosion in numbers of diamondback moths Rothamsted Research
Mated female diamondback moths were more attracted to odors that emanated from the larvae-infested cabbage plant than those from intact uninfested cabbage plants--as measured by arrival rates in the wind tunnel.
Some populations of diamondback moths are no longer affected by sprays organic farmers use on cabbage and related crops.
In addition to synthetic insecticide-resistance development worldwide, several pests have developed resistance to foliar Bt, including Indianmeal moths, diamondback moths, and at least nine other insects," says entomologist D.