terrapin

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Related to diamondback terrapins: Malaclemys terrapin

terrapin

(tĕr`əpĭn), name for several edible turtlesturtle,
a reptile of the order Chelonia, with strong, beaked, toothless jaws and, usually, an armorlike shell. The shell normally consists of bony plates overlaid with horny shields.
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 of fresh or brackish water.

terrapin

[′ter·ə·pən]
(vertebrate zoology)
Any of several North American tortoises in the family Testudinidae, especially the diamondback terrapin.

terrapin

any of various web-footed chelonian reptiles that live on land and in fresh water and feed on small aquatic animals: family Emydidae
References in periodicals archive ?
Fish and Wildlife Service, and other terrapin experts to develop management strategies to enhance protection of diamondback terrapins in order to sustain the species in New Jersey.
Habitat selection and movements of diamondback terrapins, Malaclemys terrapin, in a Maryland estuary.
The effectiveness of bycatch reduction devices on crab pots at reducing capture and mortality of diamondback terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin) in Florida.
Crab pot-induced mortality is a major threat to the survival status of diamondback terrapins throughout their range, including Alabama (Seigel and Gibbons, 1995; Butler et al, 2006).
Mercury in follicles from two different Diamondback terrapins measured 728 ppb and 831 ppb.
Evaluating the efficiency and necessity of requiring bycatch reduction devices on pots in the peeler crab fishery: quantifying and characterizing the spatial and temporal overlap of activities between diamondback terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin) and the commercial fishery for peeler blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus).
Along the East Coast, the diamondback terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin), or saltwater terrapin, was heavily collected in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, selling for as much as sixty dollars per dozen, (26) to the point where the species could no longer support the intensity of commercial harvest.
The diamondback terrapin has long been special to many people who live in or and visit our coastal communities, said Commissioner Martin.
A turtle excluder device (TED) was developed by Wood(1,2) to reduce incidental capture of diamondback terrapins in blue crab traps.
Diamondback terrapins frequent some of the same shallow waters along the Atlantic coast as crabs do, and they are attracted by the same fish or other bait used in crabbing.