Diaspora


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Wikipedia.

Diaspora

(dīăs`pərə) [Gr.,=dispersion], term used today to denote the Jewish communities living outside the Holy Land. It was originally used to designate the dispersal of the Jews at the time of the destruction of the first Temple (586 B.C.) and the forced exile [Heb.,=Galut] to Babylonia (see Babylonian captivityBabylonian captivity,
in the history of Israel, the period from the fall of Jerusalem (586 B.C.) to the reconstruction in Palestine of a new Jewish state (after 538 B.C.).
..... Click the link for more information.
). The diaspora became a permanent feature of Jewish life; by A.D. 70 Jewish communities existed in Babylonia, Syria, Egypt, Cyrene, Asia Minor, Greece, and Rome. Jews followed the Romans into Europe and from Persia and Babylonia spread as far east as China. In modern times, Jews have migrated to the Americas, South Africa, and Australia. The Jewish population of Central and Eastern Europe, until World War II the largest in the world, was decimated in the HolocaustHolocaust
, name given to the period of persecution and extermination of European Jews by Nazi Germany. Romani (Gypsies), homosexuals, Jehovah's Witnesses, the disabled, and others were also victims of the Holocaust.
..... Click the link for more information.
. Despite the creation of the state of Israel in 1948, the vast majority of the Jewish people remains in the diaspora, notably in North America, Russia, and Ukraine. The term diaspora has also been applied to other peoples with large numbers living outside their traditional homelands. See JewsJews
[from Judah], traditionally, descendants of Judah, the fourth son of Jacob, whose tribe, with that of his half-brother Benjamin, made up the kingdom of Judah; historically, members of the worldwide community of adherents to Judaism.
..... Click the link for more information.
; JudaismJudaism
, the religious beliefs and practices and the way of life of the Jews. The term itself was first used by Hellenized Jews to describe their religious practice, but it is of predominantly modern usage; it is not used in the Bible or in Rabbinic literature and only rarely
..... Click the link for more information.
.

diaspora

(from the Greek dia, through, and speiro, scatter) the situation of any group of people dispersed, whether forcibly or voluntarily, throughout the world. Referring particularly to the Jewish experience, the term may be applied to any comparable migrant groups. In a world ever more subject to GLOBALIZATION, diasporic communities are increasingly a feature of the world and the social and political implications of these are much studied. See also POST-COLONIAL THEORY.

Diaspora

 

the residence of a significant portion of a people (ethnic group) outside their native land. Diasporas have occurred as a result of forced deportation, the threat of genocide, and economic and geographic factors. Originally the term “diaspora” denoted the existence of Jews outside Palestine, especially after their exile by the Babylonian king Nebuchadnezzar II at the beginning of the sixth century B.C. and by the Romans in the first and second centuries A.D. Subsequently, the term was applied to other ethnic and religious groups, such as the Armenians, Irish, Chinese, and early Christians.

Diaspora

1. 
a. the dispersion of the Jews after the Babylonian and Roman conquests of Palestine
b. the Jewish communities outside Israel
c. the Jews living outside Israel
d. the extent of Jewish settlement outside Israel
2. (in the New Testament) the body of Christians living outside Palestine
3. a dispersion or spreading, as of people originally belonging to one nation or having a common culture
References in periodicals archive ?
Our diaspora implements excellent projects beyond BiH- in the Western Europe countries.
His sentiments were echoed by Albanian State Minister for Diaspora Pandeli Majko who referred to Albanians living abroad as a precious and an unexplored asset.
A sum of Rs 16 crore has been set aside for the benefit of the diaspora that earns less than Rs one lakh annually to meet their urgent needs.
Undoubtedly, the behavior of the Armenian governmentaffectsthe mood of both the country's society and the diaspora.
The Indian Diaspora Day was inaugurated by Ambassador of India Venu Rajamony.
The calls come only two weeks after the alliance proposed the creation of a diaspora office in each county to enhance devolution, and prevent the counties from over-reliance on the national government and foreign aid organisations to drive growth.
In the meantime, however, we can use Diasporas Reimagined as a springboard and inspiration for debating the diversity of immigrant communities and reimagining the migration scholars' and the general public's views of who we, the members--both the enthusiastic and the reluctant ones--of the diaspora really are.
The Kashmiri diaspora, he said, had always given prominence to the international dimension of the dispute and urged their own governments and parliaments to ask the United Nations to follow through its resolutions asking for a plebiscite in Jammu and Kashmir to let its people decide their own political future.
I am here today because I believe in your power, the power of today's innovators and the power of Lebanon's diaspora," he said.
Next, the author argues that Circassians fulfill most criteria for being a diaspora provided by Safran, and would fit in "victim diaspora" in the typology of Cohen.
Fortunately, there is at least one such initiative that will have a direct impact on the specific challenge that Brexit presents, namely diaspora engagement.
The role of Pakistani medical diaspora in improving the health care system and socio-economic development of the country through brain circulation is discussed in this paper.