Diaspora

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Diaspora

(dīăs`pərə) [Gr.,=dispersion], term used today to denote the Jewish communities living outside the Holy Land. It was originally used to designate the dispersal of the Jews at the time of the destruction of the first Temple (586 B.C.) and the forced exile [Heb.,=Galut] to Babylonia (see Babylonian captivityBabylonian captivity,
in the history of Israel, the period from the fall of Jerusalem (586 B.C.) to the reconstruction in Palestine of a new Jewish state (after 538 B.C.).
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). The diaspora became a permanent feature of Jewish life; by A.D. 70 Jewish communities existed in Babylonia, Syria, Egypt, Cyrene, Asia Minor, Greece, and Rome. Jews followed the Romans into Europe and from Persia and Babylonia spread as far east as China. In modern times, Jews have migrated to the Americas, South Africa, and Australia. The Jewish population of Central and Eastern Europe, until World War II the largest in the world, was decimated in the HolocaustHolocaust
, name given to the period of persecution and extermination of European Jews by Nazi Germany. Romani (Gypsies), homosexuals, Jehovah's Witnesses, the disabled, and others were also victims of the Holocaust.
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. Despite the creation of the state of Israel in 1948, the vast majority of the Jewish people remains in the diaspora, notably in North America, Russia, and Ukraine. The term diaspora has also been applied to other peoples with large numbers living outside their traditional homelands. See JewsJews
[from Judah], traditionally, descendants of Judah, the fourth son of Jacob, whose tribe, with that of his half-brother Benjamin, made up the kingdom of Judah; historically, members of the worldwide community of adherents to Judaism.
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; JudaismJudaism
, the religious beliefs and practices and the way of life of the Jews. The term itself was first used by Hellenized Jews to describe their religious practice, but it is of predominantly modern usage; it is not used in the Bible or in Rabbinic literature and only rarely
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.

diaspora

(from the Greek dia, through, and speiro, scatter) the situation of any group of people dispersed, whether forcibly or voluntarily, throughout the world. Referring particularly to the Jewish experience, the term may be applied to any comparable migrant groups. In a world ever more subject to GLOBALIZATION, diasporic communities are increasingly a feature of the world and the social and political implications of these are much studied. See also POST-COLONIAL THEORY.

Diaspora

 

the residence of a significant portion of a people (ethnic group) outside their native land. Diasporas have occurred as a result of forced deportation, the threat of genocide, and economic and geographic factors. Originally the term “diaspora” denoted the existence of Jews outside Palestine, especially after their exile by the Babylonian king Nebuchadnezzar II at the beginning of the sixth century B.C. and by the Romans in the first and second centuries A.D. Subsequently, the term was applied to other ethnic and religious groups, such as the Armenians, Irish, Chinese, and early Christians.

Diaspora

1. 
a. the dispersion of the Jews after the Babylonian and Roman conquests of Palestine
b. the Jewish communities outside Israel
c. the Jews living outside Israel
d. the extent of Jewish settlement outside Israel
2. (in the New Testament) the body of Christians living outside Palestine
3. a dispersion or spreading, as of people originally belonging to one nation or having a common culture
References in periodicals archive ?
In chapter four, Valkeakari discusses the Windrush era of black diasporic experience.
Looking at Vishniac, we need to summon a wary diasporic eye in order to see through our own needy nostalgia, and thus interrogate our desire to use Vishniac's images as a mode of chanting kaddish, despite the caution against viewing the powerful photos in A Vanished World through a mediating, backshadowing lens.
The book constitutes a valuable reference work which should be recommended to students and scholars of both contemporary British theatre and diasporic culture and aesthetics
Similarly, multiculturalism has co-opted difference, losing its political force and its projects of social justice, and presenting a discourse that potentially assimilates and ghettoizes Caribbean diasporic fiction.
Here, Kang extends these discourses to diasporic and global discourses.
Therefore, the manner by which the ontology of dispersal--that is, separated from not just home, but more importantly, separated from teacher (Shaykh)--located in listening practices in addition to sharing practices gives us an interesting point of entry for articulating the diasporic nature of this relationship.
These beginning scenes, both in their plot and in their extensive use of literary and historical quotations, set up key thematic concerns of the play: the way that textuality can make space for sexuality, the potential of claiming the Western tradition as one's own but also the treacherous nature of this process (as expressed here both by quotations from the Western literary canon and the effects of Moj's literacy), and the multiplicity of diasporic identities that Moj encompasses, seen in the way that Moj identifies with--and loves--another slave but is separated from her by the privilege borne of Moj's connection to Western power.
With the exception of Gonzalez's own engaging chapter, 'Navigations', and its focus upon Liverpool's port as a significant cultural conduit in trans-Atlantic circulation routes (examples being the cross-pollination of minstrelsy with Irish and African diasporic manifestations), notions of diaspora in the rest of the book remain viewed from an American standpoint, and the impact this has for US-centric black performance heritages.
After an introduction by the editors highlighting the plurality of India and its diaspora, the first section, "Setting the Diasporic Stage," is meant to lay some historical groundwork.
Into this new contemporary situation, Jewish diasporic humor would provide a new idiom and focus for comedic narrative and provide Jews with a balanced way to be connected to their heritage while maintaining a relationship to the larger American community.
Combining history with sociology, Bayeh examines how the literature that was born out of this expatriate community reflects a Lebanese diasporic imaginary that is super-sensitive to the entangled associations of place and identity.
In Diaspora Online, Ruxandra Trandafoiu demonstrates how migrant internet use is involved in the formation of diasporic identities.