Diaspora

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Diaspora

(dīăs`pərə) [Gr.,=dispersion], term used today to denote the Jewish communities living outside the Holy Land. It was originally used to designate the dispersal of the Jews at the time of the destruction of the first Temple (586 B.C.) and the forced exile [Heb.,=Galut] to Babylonia (see Babylonian captivityBabylonian captivity,
in the history of Israel, the period from the fall of Jerusalem (586 B.C.) to the reconstruction in Palestine of a new Jewish state (after 538 B.C.).
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). The diaspora became a permanent feature of Jewish life; by A.D. 70 Jewish communities existed in Babylonia, Syria, Egypt, Cyrene, Asia Minor, Greece, and Rome. Jews followed the Romans into Europe and from Persia and Babylonia spread as far east as China. In modern times, Jews have migrated to the Americas, South Africa, and Australia. The Jewish population of Central and Eastern Europe, until World War II the largest in the world, was decimated in the HolocaustHolocaust
, name given to the period of persecution and extermination of European Jews by Nazi Germany. Romani (Gypsies), homosexuals, Jehovah's Witnesses, the disabled, and others were also victims of the Holocaust.
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. Despite the creation of the state of Israel in 1948, the vast majority of the Jewish people remains in the diaspora, notably in North America, Russia, and Ukraine. The term diaspora has also been applied to other peoples with large numbers living outside their traditional homelands. See JewsJews
[from Judah], traditionally, descendants of Judah, the fourth son of Jacob, whose tribe, with that of his half-brother Benjamin, made up the kingdom of Judah; historically, members of the worldwide community of adherents to Judaism.
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; JudaismJudaism
, the religious beliefs and practices and the way of life of the Jews. The term itself was first used by Hellenized Jews to describe their religious practice, but it is of predominantly modern usage; it is not used in the Bible or in Rabbinic literature and only rarely
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.

diaspora

(from the Greek dia, through, and speiro, scatter) the situation of any group of people dispersed, whether forcibly or voluntarily, throughout the world. Referring particularly to the Jewish experience, the term may be applied to any comparable migrant groups. In a world ever more subject to GLOBALIZATION, diasporic communities are increasingly a feature of the world and the social and political implications of these are much studied. See also POST-COLONIAL THEORY.

Diaspora

 

the residence of a significant portion of a people (ethnic group) outside their native land. Diasporas have occurred as a result of forced deportation, the threat of genocide, and economic and geographic factors. Originally the term “diaspora” denoted the existence of Jews outside Palestine, especially after their exile by the Babylonian king Nebuchadnezzar II at the beginning of the sixth century B.C. and by the Romans in the first and second centuries A.D. Subsequently, the term was applied to other ethnic and religious groups, such as the Armenians, Irish, Chinese, and early Christians.

Diaspora

1. 
a. the dispersion of the Jews after the Babylonian and Roman conquests of Palestine
b. the Jewish communities outside Israel
c. the Jews living outside Israel
d. the extent of Jewish settlement outside Israel
2. (in the New Testament) the body of Christians living outside Palestine
3. a dispersion or spreading, as of people originally belonging to one nation or having a common culture
References in periodicals archive ?
For entertainment, the ship's crew puts on blackface performances, adding to the sheer variety of ways that the play explores the performativity of race and gender and connecting the instability of identity with travel through space, a key issue for diasporic identities.
Therefore, both the authors of this article acknowledge our situated-ness as insider researchers to the South Asian diasporic community.
Despite its reluctant acknowledgements to the contrary, contemporary criticism continues to read the diasporic literary text as an invitation for ethical engagement with the marginalized, displaced, and essentially victimized other.
This, according to Makalani, led the ABB to build an African Diasporic organization, explore race through this prism, embrace Black differences and similarities, and challenge the Comintern and the white left.
Jazz Cosmopolitanism in Accra is an important theoretical intervention in "cosmopolitanism from below" and a powerful narrative about jazz as an African diasporic art form from the standpoint of musicians in Accra.
Diasporic creativity is continually confronted with these issues of "identity," "essence," "existence," "reality," and "mapping the territory," much more than the creative consciousness operating in the indigenous ambience.
Steinberg went to visit the "little Liberia" founded in New York's urban jungle in 2008, met with its leaders there and found that this Liberian enclave in New York may have represented, for many of its inhabitants, a way to "cheat geography" by recreating a diasporic home away from home, in Steinberg's words: "On Park Hill Avenue, one can cheat geography.
The narratives he portrays in the conversation between the Diaspora and Israel suggest that Diasporic Jews are inferior to Israeli Jews in Israel because Galut Jews are not true Zionists, as demonstrated by their choice to exchange the harsh life in Israel for a calm and prosperous life in the Diaspora (sitting around "pots of flesh"--Exodus 16:2-4).
It is estimated that approximately 45 million diasporic Chinese (the term is used here interchangeably with overseas/ethnic Chinese) now live outside mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan and Macao, of whom over 80 per cent reside in Southeast Asia; new migrants--those who emigrated from China after the end of the 1970s--numbered about six million in 2009.
The Chinese newspapers have occupied the first position in Australian diasporic press arena since the 1940s.
Moreover, a tendency to focus on the socioeconomic aspects of migrant life--such as integration, employment, and transnational remittances--has led to a lack of attention being paid to migrants' cultural practices, and the different ways in which diasporic groups carve out spaces of belonging in and engagement with host society settings.
Narratives of Citizenship: Indigenous and Diasporic Peoples Unsettle the Nation-State provides thirteen essays considering cultural arts and products that represent concepts of citizenship as a narrative construct in Canada and beyond.