diastolic pressure


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diastolic pressure

[¦dī·ə¦stäl·ik ′presh·ər]
(physiology)
The lowest arterial blood pressure during the cardiac cycle; reflects relaxation and dilation of a heart chamber.
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001) in the patients with OSA when compared to the controls, while the diastolic pressure difference in the isometric hand-grip exercise test ([DELTA][DBP.
Those who are considered to have "prehypertension" have a systolic pressure between 120 and 139 and a diastolic pressure between 80 and 89.
There was no effect of cholecalciferol supplementation on diastolic pressure (P = 0.
Reduced arterial distensibility and compliance contributes to an increase in pulse wave and pulse wave velocity, which increases systolic and pulse pressures and decreases diastolic pressure.
Diastolic Pressure (the bottom number) reflects the arterial pressure between heartbeats.
Figure 1 presents the means for systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, and pulse for each of the five phases: 1) baseline, 2) holding animal, 3) baseline, 4) holding animal, and 5) baseline.
The second number is the diastolic pressure and is the lowest pressure of blood when the heart is relaxed.
It is diagnosed in people with a systolic blood pressure (taken when the heart muscle contracts) of 140 mm Hg or greater, or a diastolic pressure (referring to the time between contractions) of 90 or more.
This will cause vasoconstriction and result in a rise in the diastolic pressure causing a narrowed pulse pressure.
Similarly diastolic pressure increases from the administration of L-NAME were inhibited with carvacrol injections.
Aortic regurgitation results in a low diastolic pressure because minimal blood remains in the aorta to maintain a higher pressure.