dibble


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dibble

a small hand tool used to make holes in the ground for planting or transplanting bulbs, seeds, or roots
References in periodicals archive ?
So, although he would love to strut his stuff at the home of Welsh football against Southend Dibble admits: 'My children are more disappointed about me not playing than I am.
Welshman Dibble, now 52, is Cardiff's goalkeeping coach, working under Neil Warnock at the club where his career began as a teenager.
Bromley, despite sitting high up in the standings ahead of the encounter at the Racecourse, rarely tested Dibble with any meaningful efforts on targets, with the exception of a handful of half-chances that were rudimentary for the giant keeper.
James Jennings handled in the box in the first half to gift visiting Bromley a penalty, but Dibble denied Frankie Raymond from the spot with a superb save.
Dibble seemed visibly affected by the error, but he would redeem himself in spectacular fashion in the second half.
Dibble Optical also supplies the Miraflex Fashion collection, consisting of 16 models in up to eight colour options.
9 had twice been denied by smart stops from Dibble but was not to be denied a third time as he latched on to a simple ball over the top, raced clear of Kelvin Langmead and deftly pushed it past the Boro keeper who was rushing out to close the angle - a killer blow with the half-time whistle coming just moments later.
Dibble denied Scott Boden after the break before the match turned when Armson was sent off for leading with an elbow when jumping for the ball on 64 minutes.
Nuneaton, without a win in six and hurting from a 5-0 hammering at Dover, gave a debut to keeper Christian Dibble, on loan from Barnsley.
Dibble fleshes out these episodes as best he can but lack of solid information soon obliges him to return to Harty's compositions and performances, the default subjects of this study.
The dying man had been forced to catch two buses to a vital hospital appointment after Dibble stole his number plates to put on a stolen car.
The hymn Jerusalem, in which words by the poet William Blake were set to music by composer Charles Hubert Parry, has been the subject of research by Durham University musicologist Professor Jeremy Dibble.