dibromide


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dibromide

[dī′brō‚mīd]
(chemistry)
Indicating the presence of two bromine atoms in a molecule.
References in periodicals archive ?
When ethylene dibromide, a fumigant used to control fruit flies, was banned in 1984, the U.
Concurrently, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) banned ethylene dibromide, a postharvest fumigant used to control vegetable and fruit infestation.
Samples of fallout from jet exhausts collected in Maryland and Pennsylvania were found to contain a hazardous pesticide, ethylene dibromide.
Most liquid-formulated fumigants such as ethylene dibromide which were used to kill insects in stored products, have been banned because of a possible risk of carcinogenicity in mammals.
Discounting methyl bromide and ethylene dibromide, whose use is being regulated out of existence, brominated hydrocarbons will enjoy above-average growth as TBBA increases its share of the flame retardants market and compounds such as n-propyl bromide find growing use in such diverse applications as solvents, adhesives and electronics cleaning, often as a replacement for more environmentally suspect substances.
From it, we learn that the potential saving of a single life by means of OSHA's current formaldehyde-exposure standard is $72 billion, by means of the same agency's ethylene dibromide standard a mere $15.
For example, traces of atrazine and hexazinone were detected in the Callide Valley, and of ethylene dibromide (EDB) in the Caboolture/Beerwah region.
A process of great promise was the preservation of cereals in polythene bags, in which fumes of ethylene dibromide could be used to prevent investation.
At that time, the main product was ethylene dibromide, an additive in antiknock gasoline compounds.
The following is a partial list (the full list would be much longer) of products and substances about which there have been notable controversies in the past couple of decades: alachlor, alar, arsenic, asbestos, benzene, biotechnology (engineered organisms), cadmium, captan, chlorophenates (2,4 - D; 2,4,5 - T; pentachlorophenol), dioxins and furans, electromagnetic fields, ethylene dibromide, forest resource management, formaldehyde, hazardous waste treatment, lead, medical devices (breast implants, Dalkon Shield, etc.
You have, however, ingested something called ethylene dibromide (EDB).
Though ethylene dibromide (EDB) is best known today as the chemical fumigant banned from use as a pesticide in most U.