dichlofluanid

dichlofluanid

[‚dī·klō·flü′an·əd]
(organic chemistry)
C9H11Cl2FN2O2S A white powder with a melting point of 105-105.6°C; insoluble in water; used as a fungicide for fruits, garden crops, and ornamental flowers.
References in periodicals archive ?
Early work in this field found that water repellents as well as copper and chromium salts, pentachlorophenol, dichlofluanid, copper-8-quinolinolate, and copper naphthenate were effective in controlling black stain fungi on coated wood (Sell and Walchli 1974, French 1977, Feist 1984).
The topics include analytical methodology for ultra-trace detection and quantification of fungicides and other priority substances covered by European regulations on environment samples, a review of literature on health and environmental risks of the fungicide and biocide dichlofluanid, anti-microbial treatments of molds and bacteria, lessons from yeast and phytopathogenic fungi about the global adaptive response and resistance to agricultural fungicides, determining benzimidazole compounds in food and environmental samples, and analyzing and removing filamentous fungi in drinking water.
Dichlofluanid and tylofluanid are through the CD state and ready to enter the DIS stage.
A fungicide dichlofluanid is metabolized to a toxic metabolite thiophosgene derivative in a process that appears to involve two GSH conjugation steps (Schuphan et al.