dicotyledon

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dicotyledon

1. any flowering plant of the class Dicotyledonae, normally having two embryonic seed leaves and leaves with netlike veins. The group includes many herbaceous plants and most families of trees and shrubs
2. primitive dicotyledon. any living relative of early angiosperms that branched off before the evolution of monocotyledons and eudicotyledons. The group comprises about 5 per cent of the world's plants

dicotyledon

[‚dī‚käd·əl′ēd·ən]
(botany)
Any plant of the class Magnoliopsida, all having two cotyledons.
References in periodicals archive ?
tabaci population, while population on Dicotyledonous was counted by examining 5 leaves per plant.
According to Diggle and DeMason (1983b), the transition of primary meristem into secondary meristem in the monocotyledonous species is analogous to the transition of procambium to vascular cambium in the woody dicotyledonous stem.
The potentials and limitations of dicotyledonous wood anatomy for climatic reconstructions.
uptake, sugar and starch contents in five dicotyledonous plants exposed to automobile exhaust pollution," Journal of Environmental Biology, vol.
They are phytophagous sap-sucking insects, majority are narrowly host-specific and predominantly associated with perennial dicotyledonous angiosperms (Hodkinson, 2009).
Begomovirus is the only genus that is transmitted by the whitefly Bemisia tabaci, infects only dicotyledonous plants and are mostly bipartite.
A major exception to this high host conservatism is the large Old World genus Diaphorina Low, 1880, which recruits hosts from at least 19 families in 10 plant orders of dicotyledonous angiosperms (Hollis 1987; Burckhardt & van Harten 2006).
1987, Middle Eocene dicotyledonous plants from Republic, Northeastern Washington: United States Geological Survey, Bulletin 1597, 25 p.
It is a herbaceous, biennial, dicotyledonous flowering plant distinguished by a short stem upon which is crowded a mass of leaves, usually green but in some varieties red or purplish, which while immature form a characteristic compact, globular cluster (cabbage head).