Dictation

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Dictation

 

one of the types of written work used to reinforce and test knowledge and to form student habits. It is used most widely in the teaching of spelling and punctuation.

Specific forms of dictation are also used in the teaching of other subjects, for example, topographical dictation in geography lessons and musical dictation in lessons of solfége in music schools and conservatories.

S. N. GROMTSEVA [8–766–3; updated]

References in classic literature ?
The harm is done by the serious, thoughtful, earnest journalists, who solemnly, as they are doing at present, will drag before the eyes of the public some incident in the private life of a great statesman, of a man who is a leader of political thought as he is a creator of political force, and invite the public to discuss the incident, to exercise authority in the matter, to give their views, and not merely to give their views, but to carry them into action, to dictate to the man upon all other points, to dictate to his party, to dictate to his country; in fact, to make themselves ridiculous, offensive, and harmful.
Colbert resumed his place at Mazarin's pillow at the first interval of pain, and persuaded him to dictate a donation thus conceived.
Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shown, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed.
Now to say that the honour I here mean, and which was, I thought, all the honour I could be supposed to mean, will uphold, much less dictate an untruth, is to assert an absurdity too shocking to be conceived.
Hale, our interests dictate us to demand of you twenty millions of dollars.
Do not suppose, however, that I wish to dictate happiness to you or that a delay on your part would cause me any serious uneasiness.
If I had yielded to that secret Dictate, I should have put all the furniture away again with my own hand, and have warned the workmen off the premises when they came the next morning.
Finally, those sentiments dictate the lines--grateful, sympathetic, paternal lines--which appear in this place.
They have no fondness for their colts or foals, but the care they take in educating them proceeds entirely from the dictates of reason.
Socrates is afraid that Crito is but pressing upon him the opinions of the many: whereas, all his life long he has followed the dictates of reason only and the opinion of the one wise or skilled man.
Even the ardent love of liberty will, after a time, give way to its dictates.
If your heart dictates you to deliver Seldon also, I declare to you I will not oppose it the least in the world.