Dido

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Dido

(dī`dō), in Roman mythology, queen of Carthage, also called Elissa. She was the daughter of a king of Tyre. After her brother Pygmalion murdered her husband, she fled to Libya, where she founded and ruled Carthage. According to one legend, Dido threw herself on a burning pyre to escape marriage to the king of Libya. In the Aeneid, Vergil tells how she fell in love with AeneasAeneas
, in Greek mythology, a Trojan, son of Anchises and Aphrodite. After the fall of Troy he escaped, bearing his aged father on his back. He stayed at Carthage with Queen Dido, then went to Italy, where his descendants founded Rome.
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, who had been shipwrecked at Carthage, and destroyed herself on the pyre when, at Jupiter's command, he left to continue his journey to Italy.

Dido

 

(also Elissa), in ancient mythology the sister of the king of Tyre (in Phoenicia). Founder of Carthage.

According to the Roman version of the myth as treated in Book IV of Vergil’s Aeneid, Dido fell in love with Aeneas, who was cast upon the shores of Carthage by a storm. After his departure she committed suicide. The figure of the lovesick and abandoned Dido has enjoyed great popularity through the centuries in literature, opera (H. Purcell, J. Haydn, and others), and painting (A. Mantegna, P. Rubens, S. Bourdon, H. Fiiger, and others).

Dido

contracts for as much land as can be enclosed by an oxhide; by cutting it into a strip she obtains enough to found a city. [Rom. Legend: Collier’s VI, 259]
See: Cunning

Dido

kills herself when Aeneas abandons her. [Rom. Myth.: Avery, 392–393; Rom. Lit.: Aeneid]
See: Suicide
References in periodicals archive ?
Writing with his own queen Elizabeth I as a model, Marlowe grants Dido authority, gravitas, and political sagacity, whereas Virgil casts Dido as Aeneas's impassioned, swooning lover and not as the magisterial and influential politician that her title suggests she should be.
Marlowe's playtext follows Ovid by placing Dido center stage, a reorganizing of Virgil's sex/gender priorities that is signaled not only by the change of eponymous hero to privilege the tragic Queen of Carthage over the Trojan epic hero but also by the transference of initiative from Aeneas to Dido.
Marlowe's Dido is astute enough to realize that her personal relationships are also political, that any lover she takes must in some way benefit the kingdom.
I then consider Dido as an emblem of love-induced madness and explore a link between her name and the nonsense words in bawdy ballads.
The pile of wood on which Marlowe's Barabas imagines sacrificing his daughter evokes the pyre that the wealthy and beautiful Dido uses for her suicide when she is abandoned by Aeneas in book 4 of the Aeneid.
Names for the queen varied considerably but might be Calpurnia, Medea, or Dido, legendary women of wealth and position.
Homosexual love is a constant undercurrent in this play, which features an oddly masculine, powerful Dido courting a boyish, effeminate Aeneas.
When Aeneas thanks Dido for her kindness to Ascanius, she replies:
Por tal razon, la urgencia de Dido es comunicarle a Eneas razones convincentes del por que es mejor no marcharse.
Dido, en su situacion particular, necesita esa alteracion de animo en Eneas para hacer mas convincente la exposicion de permanecer en tierras punicas.
Mas un soldado joven, que venia escuchando la platica movida, diciendo me atajo que no tenia a Dido por tan casta y recogida, pues en la Eneyda de Maron veria que del amor libidino encendida, siguiendo el torpe fin de su deseo rompio la fe y promesa a su Sicheo (22)
La vida de Dido que relata Ercilla es, por tanto, la que habia nacido en los mismos tiempos romanos, en testimonios historiograficos anteriores a Virgilio, y que ofrecian una imagen de la reina como figura heroica y ejemplar.