Dido

(redirected from didos)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Wikipedia.

Dido

(dī`dō), in Roman mythology, queen of Carthage, also called Elissa. She was the daughter of a king of Tyre. After her brother Pygmalion murdered her husband, she fled to Libya, where she founded and ruled Carthage. According to one legend, Dido threw herself on a burning pyre to escape marriage to the king of Libya. In the Aeneid, Vergil tells how she fell in love with AeneasAeneas
, in Greek mythology, a Trojan, son of Anchises and Aphrodite. After the fall of Troy he escaped, bearing his aged father on his back. He stayed at Carthage with Queen Dido, then went to Italy, where his descendants founded Rome.
..... Click the link for more information.
, who had been shipwrecked at Carthage, and destroyed herself on the pyre when, at Jupiter's command, he left to continue his journey to Italy.

Dido

 

(also Elissa), in ancient mythology the sister of the king of Tyre (in Phoenicia). Founder of Carthage.

According to the Roman version of the myth as treated in Book IV of Vergil’s Aeneid, Dido fell in love with Aeneas, who was cast upon the shores of Carthage by a storm. After his departure she committed suicide. The figure of the lovesick and abandoned Dido has enjoyed great popularity through the centuries in literature, opera (H. Purcell, J. Haydn, and others), and painting (A. Mantegna, P. Rubens, S. Bourdon, H. Fiiger, and others).

Dido

contracts for as much land as can be enclosed by an oxhide; by cutting it into a strip she obtains enough to found a city. [Rom. Legend: Collier’s VI, 259]
See: Cunning

Dido

kills herself when Aeneas abandons her. [Rom. Myth.: Avery, 392–393; Rom. Lit.: Aeneid]
See: Suicide
References in periodicals archive ?
Names for the queen varied considerably but might be Calpurnia, Medea, or Dido, legendary women of wealth and position.
Virgil's account of Dido in the first four books of the Aeneid was employed by Shakespeare as a prototype for visual diminution because in that story, Aeneas is imagined sailing far away from her, and, after her suicide by the sword, looking back upon her funeral pyre.
How often have I tempted Suffolk's tongue, The agent of thy foul inconstancy, To sit and witch me, as Ascanius did, When he to madding Dido would unfold His father's acts commenced in burning Troy.
It did not escape Marlowe and Shakespeare that the letters in the name Dido, which appeared on the queen of diamonds, were also contained in the word diamond, or that her marital status was described by the word widow, whose sound resonated with--and whose spelling contained the letters of--her name of Dido.
An opportunity to play upon the name of Dido is rarely resisted.
For Shakespeare, Dido is the epitome of someone verging on madness because of love, whether or not that love is originally wholesome.
Virgil describes both him and Dido as "forgetting their kingdoms, rapt in a trance of lust" (Aen.
In the ensuing quarrel with Dido, Aeneas is almost torn apart by the conflicting emotions of passion and piety within him, but we are left in no doubt as to which he will choose.
The strength of Aeneas' pietas is indicated in his expectation that Dido has to be content with his tossing their love aside in this manner.
Here, Dido expresses her feelings in a manner that can hardly be called subtle, agonizing over
Dido then showers him with gifts and seems to transform him into a "cardboard cutout" of Sychaeus,18 attempting to re-write his destiny as King of Carthage rather than founder of Rome:
Aeneas] never achieves a heroic status and consequently remains a puppet for the gods, temporarily a prisoner or pet for Dido to show off to her people .