dieback


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dieback

[′dī‚bak]
(ecology)
A large area of exposed, unprotected swamp or marsh deposits resulting from the salinity of a coastal lagoon.
(plant pathology)
Of a plant, to die from the top or peripheral parts.

dieback

A condition often found in woody plant material where browning and death of the plant cells begin from the tip inward and may continue as far as the woody or perennial part of the plant.
References in periodicals archive ?
Grewal said the technique was gaining popularity among mango farmers and expressed optimism that no mango tree would remain fruitless due to Dieback in the next two years in South Punjab mango belt.
Ash dieback is another fungus for which gardeners have no chemical control, the disease affecting trees of all ages.
Mr Jacob said the Phyto Fighter units, already in use by the Department of Parks and Wildlife on the south coast, helped remove dieback spores from footwear, thereby helping to limit the risk of the disease s spread.
Ash dieback, which can kill ash trees, is thought to have arrived on wind-blown spores and on imported saplings and has raised concerns about the future of one of the countryside's most common trees.
Dead or dying tops of trees, most easily seen throughout summer; wilting leaves, most visible in spring and early summer; lesions and cankers on stems/branches/shoots, visible throughout the year; dieback of leaves with brown/black leaf stalks, seen throughout summer; fruiting bodies on fallen blacked leaf stalks, visible June to October; staining of wood under bark lesions, visible throughout the year.
And now we're confronting a new threat, ash dieback - caused by the fungus Chalara fraxinea attacking our third most abundant broadleaf species.
A NEW plan for combating ash dieback has been welcomed by environmentalists.
But he raised hopes that trees could be identified which were resistant to Chalara ash dieback, and said the disease did not necessarily spell the end of the British ash.
The young trees, on Forestry Commission land, were removed as a precaution in an attempt to prevent Chalara dieback of ash from entering Wales.
The complex includes a new shot hole borer and a symbiotic Fusarium species, which causes branch dieback.