dielectric loss factor

dielectric loss factor

[‚dī·ə¦lek·trik ¦los ‚fak·tər]
(electricity)
Product of the dielectric constant of a material and the tangent of its dielectric loss angle.
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These transitions can be determined by mechanical and dielectric relaxation processes, in which the mechanical transition and dielectric loss factor go to maxima within the transition region.
Motion of dipolar groups and ions in the film varies during processing, which leads to changes in electrical properties, including permittivity, dielectric loss factor, and conductivity.
The dielectric properties of the resulting plasma thin films were evaluated and results show that the dielectric constant of the three polycyanurate thin films decreased with increasing frequency, while in contrast, the dielectric loss factor increased with the increasing frequency.
The variation of dielectric loss factor (imaginary part of the complex permittivity) with various frequency of PANI and their nanocomposite at room temperature is given in Fig.
Figure 6 shows the variation of the dielectric loss factor of the composites of varying amounts of ATH with frequency.
The composites showed significant changes in dielectric constant, dielectric loss factor, and dissipation factor.
Because of particularly low dielectric loss factor in radio frequency range, PPS is a good candidate material for embedded capacitors, capacitively coupled electrical solutions and other integrated high-frequency electronic devices in multilayered structure (11).
The relative permittivity ([epsilon]') is mainly associated with dipole orientation, while the dielectric loss factor ([epsilon]") is a measure of the total energy lost in a dielectric material, which is influenced by both dipole motion and ion migration.
The dielectric constant contributes to stored electromagnetic energy while the dielectric loss factor is related to electromagnetic power dissipated as heat in the materials.
The authors have developed a 2-dimensional numerical model to represent the microwave curing of a single lap adhesive-bonded joint with adherends having low dielectric loss factor.
The dielectric loss factor (the imaginary component of the complex permittivity) or the ionic conductivity is then inversely related to the polymer melt viscosity, as is shown in the following section.
The choice of PTFE is justified by several advantages such as a low dielectric loss factor (3 X [10.