deficiency

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deficiency

Biology the absence of a gene or a region of a chromosome normally present
References in periodicals archive ?
In the study, it was found that the most common cause of iron deficiency anaemia was probably due to increased loss of blood as in case of menorrhagia seen in 34%, followed by dietary deficiency as assessed by the poor nutritional status seen in 18% and increased demand as in pregnancy seen in 36%.
She said that the team found that this dietary deficiency can compromise the behavioral health of adolescents, not only because their diet is deficient but because their parents' diet was deficient as well.
A dietary deficiency leads to lightening of coat or reddening of black hairs.
1] The incidence of pellagra from dietary deficiency has decreased dramatically as China's economy has improved but individual cases still occur.
The iron absorption test is the simplest way to quantify the stage of iron depletion, and to differentiate dietary deficiency from malabsorption syndromes.
An increasing number of doctors now believe that hypothyroidism could be precipitated by a dietary deficiency in iodine, a trace element found in the thyroid's T3 and T4 hormones and essential in small amounts for good health.
Lawrence, a pediatric geneticist in South Wales, published a paper linking the relatively high incidence to a dietary deficiency of folic acid.
Each chapter focuses on a specific vitamin, describing the researchers, the research, and the historic and scientific contexts for its discovery, and chronicling the ongoing conflict between physicians who saw illness as caused by organisms and those who saw illness as a result of dietary deficiency.
Hypoalbuminaemia, parathyroid disorders, respiratory alkalosis and dietary deficiency can cause hypocalcaemia(1).
Iron deficiency may be due to reduced iron intake because of dietary deficiency or malabsorption or to an increased demand because of haemorrhage or increased physiological requirements, e.