diethyl phthalate


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diethyl phthalate

[dī′eth·əl ′tha‚lāt]
(organic chemistry)
C6H4(CO2C2H5)2 Clear, colorless, odorless liquid with bitter taste, boiling at 298°C; soluble in alcohols, ketones, esters, and aromatic hydrocarbons, partly soluble in aliphatic solvents; used as a cellulosic solvent, wetting agent, alcohol denaturant, mosquito repellent, and in perfumes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Toxicity study of diethyl phthalate on freshwater fish Cirrhina mrigala.
Of note, the enteric coating on many of these products is diethyl phthalate, and high doses of some phthalates may cause developmental toxicity, but the embryo or fetus is exposed to very small quantities.
Small amounts of a phthalates known as dibutyl phthalate (DBP) make nail polish chip resistant and when perfumes are dissolved in diethyl phthalate (DEP) or dimethyl phthalate (DMP), their scent lingers longer.
The study found a correlation between damage to DNA in sperm and exposure to diethyl phthalate (DEP) at levels already present in the men.
A ministry investigative panel on endocrine disrupters decided in a meeting Wednesday to include in the list butyl benzyl phthalate, diethyl phthalate and diethylhexyl adipate, substances used for plastics, and triphenyl tin, used to paint the hulls of ships, the officials said.
The PVC plasticized with diethyl phthalate, which has good solubility in PVC, has a fairly narrow tan [delta] peak.
On the other hand, diethyl phthalate (DEP) is more volatile (compared to other phthalates) and is therefore not used to make flexible vinyl.
In addition, personal care products are likely the predominant source of diethyl phthalate (DEP), dimethyl phthalate (DMP), and di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP) (Just et al.
The study lists diethyl phthalate (DEP) as a phthalate used in fragrances, but then notes ".
Called dibutyl phthalate (DBP) and diethyl phthalate (DEP), these chemicals affect the reproductive tracts of developing males, leading to hormonal, fertility and reproductive problems, said Shanna Swan, a reproductive epidemiologist at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York.
The move to remove phthalates was in response to an increasing number of questions from consumers, and marks another example of SC Johnson going beyond regulatory requirements in its product development, according to Beard, who added that the particular phthalate that raised concern, diethyl phthalate (DEP), was extensively researched and was deemed safe by various scientific bodies.
The plasticizer can be dibutyl phthalate (DBP), dimethyl phthalate (DMP), or diethyl phthalate (DEP).