differential aileron

differential aileron

Those ailerons whose extent of angular movement up and down is different. Normally, up-going aileron travels more than a downgoing aileron. The parasite drag on the wing with the up-going aileron is higher to compensate for the additional induced and parasitic drag caused by the down-going aileron. This balancing of drag helps minimize adverse aileron yaw.
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Another method engineers use to minimize adverse yaw is the differential aileron design, pictured in Figure 2 on the opposite page.
The reason differential aileron movement works is that deflection of an aileron upward can't do much harm; it is the aileron deflected downward that can be the "troublemaker," i.
To help reduce the likelihood of wing tip stall and adverse yaw, engineers developed differential ailerons.
Also, many planes use differential aileron throw or other design techniques to minimize adverse yaw.
Differential ailerons, well, differ in the degree of deflection between inside and outside wings.
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