differential leveling

differential leveling

[‚dif·ə′ren·chəl ′lev·əl·iŋ]
(engineering)
A surveying process in which a horizontal line of sight of known elevation is intercepted by a graduated standard, or rod, held vertically on the point being checked.

differential leveling

The process of establishing the difference in elevation between any two points by using a level, 1 and a leveling rod.
References in periodicals archive ?
Complete the three checks for error used with differential leveling.
The following sections will explain the principles of leveling and how these principles are used in differential leveling.
The utility of differential leveling is described in the name.
A second use of differential leveling is establishing the elevation of a new benchmark.
Part of the art of differential leveling is being able to complete the survey with the fewest number of turning points.
The purpose of differential leveling is to compare the elevation of two or more points.
It is much easier to complete a differential leveling survey on a flat open field, than if the survey must traverse hills, forests, creeks, and so on.
The table used for differential leveling data uses columns and rows.
Both profile and differential leveling use backsights, foresights, benchmarks, and turning points.
For differential leveling, the only critical feature of station identification is that an organized method be used so that the system is clear to the user of the notes.
In differential leveling, each station is used as a backsight and a foresight.
As in differential leveling, the sights should be balanced, if possible.

Full browser ?