differential rotation


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differential rotation

(dif-ĕ-ren -shăl) Rotation of different parts of a system at different speeds. It occurs in a system, such as a star, composed primarily of gas. A solid body, such as the Earth, rotates uniformly. The Sun and the giant planets, such as Jupiter, rotate differentially such that their equatorial regions move somewhat faster than areas closer to the poles. See also galactic rotation.
References in periodicals archive ?
This differential rotation stretches out the field along the equator, (v is for velocity)
With this he studied the differential rotation of Sun between 1901 and 1906 (see Halm, 1904) and was awarded the Brisbane medal of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
Differential rotation of stars, magnetic and magnetorotational instabilities are discussed thoroughly and a theory of driven turbulence in formulated using both simulations and observations.
During bending, the plates may undergo differential rotation due to the difference in the levels of the bottom surface of the slab and flange.
The differential rotation extends considerably down into the interior of the Sun but the core of the Sun rotates as a solid body.
This likelihood of frequent flips "makes it very attractive to monitor tau Bootis and possibly other similar stars with high differential rotation, which may improve our understanding of the generation and dynamics of magnetic fields in stars," says Marina Romanova of Cornell University.
Its outer layers exhibit differential rotation, at the equator the surface rotates once every 25.
Previous models of stellar convection were limited to small areas on the star's surface, too small to help researchers understand how differential rotation is established.
Such globally coherent magnetic fields arise because our star's outer, convective layer of ionized gas slides across the lower, non-convective layer faster at the equator than it does at the poles, called differential rotation.
We have been studying through 3-D global simulations the nature of both differential rotation and dynamo action that can be achieved in G-type stars like the sun by turbulent convection in their outer envelopes, and also by core convection in more massive A-type stars.
Different points rotate at different rates, in a process called differential rotation.
Perhaps, though Cassini has not observed any differential rotation between the hexagon's interior and exterior.

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