diffraction-limited

diffraction-limited

[di′frak·shən ′lim·əd·əd]
(optics)
Capable of producing images whose separations are as small as the theoretical limit imposed by diffraction effects.
References in periodicals archive ?
TERS has the potential to overcome the restrictions of other optical/spectroscopic methods to study 2D materials, namely (i) insufficient spatial resolution of diffraction-limited optical methods; (ii) the need for labelling for all methods relying on fluorescence; and (iii) the inability of some methods to work in liquids.
It uses LED light sources, Semrock filters, advanced optical engineering and CMOS sensors to provide near diffraction-limited resolution.
In recent years, interest has increased in pushing the diffraction-limited spatial resolution performance of FTIR imaging systems, primarily using synchrotron-based systems.
5-arcsecond achievable without AO, but not diffraction-limited.
However, a number of recent advancements in optical imaging techniques are able to improve the ability of light to propagate through tissues with diffraction-limited beam qualities.
18) A similar diffraction-limited technique called total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy generates a near-field wave at the surface of a specimen.
2] factor, defined as the beam parameter product divided by the corresponding product for a diffraction-limited Gaussian beam with the same wavelength (Paschotta, 2004).
Instead of scanning a diffraction-limited laser spot across the sample, a spinning disk with multiple holes uses a light source to produce high-speed, nondiffracted images, resulting in highly accurate, real-time imaging of cells or tissue.
In addition, the laser's near diffraction-limited output makes it usable for applications such as micro-machining where extremely small spot size is critical.
54 mm, the device offers diffraction-limited, short-pulse output over a wide repetition rate range.
Nanoscale resolution beats the wavelength-scale limits imposed by diffraction-limited, classical optics by a factor of 100.