gastrointestinal tract

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gastrointestinal tract

[¦ga·strō‚in′tes·tən·əl ′trakt]
(anatomy)
The stomach and intestine.
References in periodicals archive ?
argenteus is a freshwater species with iliophagous eating habits and a digestive system featuring an oropharyngeal cavity, esophagus and rectum digestive tube in formation on the 3rd DAH.
The stomach is an expanded part of the digestive tube that lies beneath the diaphragm.
fortunei (whole and live) found in the digestive tube of the captured fish species.
In all regions of the digestive tube, the wall of the gut consists of three layers--a folded innermost luminal (digestive) epithelium, which is endodermal in origin; an outermost complex muscular mesothelium (gut coelomic epithelium), which derives from the mesoderm; and a connective tissue layer, sandwiched between the two epithelia and delimited by their basal laminae.
Because this tube is literally full of bacteria and surgeons are extremely careful to create an aseptic environment for their work, it has been standard protocol to use antibiotics to rid as many organisms as possible from the "new" digestive tube.
Absorption involves moving these compounds from inside the lumen of the digestive tube across the wall of the digestive tube, and making them available to the body's tissues.
The part of the digestive tube connecting the stomach to the colon.
The reason for this investigation will be to compare the genes between the embryonic digestive tube bacteria of Neolithic man with those of the present day modern man.
AIMS AND OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the incidence and pattern of developmental malformation of digestive tube in newborn babies.
One problem that appears to be universal is that students are confused by the order of the organs of the digestive tube, let alone their functions.
fraudatrix can expel the entire digestive tube (except the cloaca) along with the pharyngeal complex through the rupture of the anterior body wall (Leibson and Dolmatov, 1989).